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If the bachelors degree is the new high school diploma?
#1
If the bachelors degree is the new high school diploma, do you think it really matters where you get it? (Exluding Ivy League, MIT, etc.)
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#2
(02-26-2019, 05:55 AM)Jwheels27 Wrote: If the bachelors degree is the new high school diploma, do you think it really matters where you get it? (Exluding Ivy League, MIT, etc.)

For traditional college age students, yes.  While there will always be jobs where the employer just checks the degree box, most employers do have some perception of the "quality" of a school and uses such perceptions in decision-making.  I had some interesting (and colorful) conversations with my brother (a recruiter)  in past years on this issue.  Employers recruit at some schools and not at others for a reason.

I think it makes less of a difference for older, more established adults who have a record of achievement and/or a current employer that may take a chance on them for a promotion to an entry-level white collar job.
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#3
No, it is not the new HS diploma - but I think the impact varies depending on where you live.  If you live in an area where it is the norm for people to have a college degree then maybe; if you live in an area where the majority are still lacking one then it puts you at an advantage (see: https://www.degreeforum.net/mybb/Thread-...ted-States).   Also it depends on the field you work in - if your goal is to be an electrician, having a Liberal Arts Bachelor (e.g.) isn't really going to matter; for that profession requires a completely different type of training beyond high school.  Overall (in the US) we are far from a college degree being what the average adult achieves; no matter if they're Millennial, Baby Boomer, or other generation.
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#4
(02-26-2019, 05:55 AM)Jwheels27 Wrote: If the bachelors degree is the new high school diploma, do you think it really matters where you get it? (Exluding Ivy League, MIT, etc.)

In alot of ways it is the new high school diploma. Most entry level job listings will list a bachelor's degree as a requirement, and there is an expectation that most students will pursue a college degree right after high school. A counterargument is that only ~30% of people have a bachelor's degree, so a bachelors degree will put you above half of the other job applicants (only 60% of the US population is in the labor force). Where you get a bachelor's degree is important if you are just starting out in your career. The networking and job opportunities vary tremendously based on which campus you attend. For people already in their career, its less important. For people who plan on attending grad school, the school they attended for undergrad is also less important to potential employers.
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#5
No, the BA/BS is not the new high school diploma, as much as the education industrial complex might want you to think it is (and therefore a must have for everyone).

Now, for those kids who want to get a degree right after high school (I have 2 kids, 1 who wants a BA, one who does not), it MAY be an option. But from what I've seen as I look at transcripts, most people, especially the ones going in at 18, either: 1) have no clue what they want to do (changing majors multiple times); 2) don't have what it takes to take college-level courses (low grades), 3) don't have the motivation (probably because of #1), 4) move at least once leaving behind an unfinished degree, or 5) any/all of the above. There is just so much going on when you're 18, it's hard to finish a degree.

Now, for those going back as adults, they may be more motivated, and they have a few years in the workforce and are able to figure out what degree they actually want/need. At that point, they may have a lot of credit under their belts and can transfer them somewhere and finish their degrees fairly easily.

But in general, it depends on where you live and what industry you're in as to whether you need a degree at all. Most I think find that it isn't needed, and never finish.
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#6
(02-26-2019, 05:55 AM)Jwheels27 Wrote: If the bachelors degree is the new high school diploma, do you think it really matters where you get it? (Exluding Ivy League, MIT, etc.)

It's not. And excluding Ivy League, no.
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Top tier will ALWAYS be in a class of their own. Beyond that, you're trying to impress people in certain circles. Running in a circle is a race to nowhere. Get in, get out, and get on with life.
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#7
I like to use the terms Ivy Plus and Public Ivies. Stanford and MIT (and a few other private schools) are included in the Ivy Plus schools, and they're more prestigious than a few of the Ivy League schools. The Public Ivies are prestigious, public universities. You will stand out if you graduate from a Public Ivy or Ivy Plus school.

Above is speaking to overall prestige. Within individual fields, prestige is often based on the program. There's a recent thread on getting a job with the Big 4 accounting firms, and the reputation of the accounting program is extremely important.
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#8
A degree isn't the new HS diploma, but the way businesses collect resumes is changing the landscape of this debate.

10 years ago, you could land a degree-level job if you were able to demonstrate industry experience. So even if I didn't have the 'required' degree, I could still wow them with my resume and portfolio, and land the job. 

But today, more companies rely on computerized pre-filtering of resumes.  If your application doesn't tick certain requirements (like a degree), it's never seen by anyone. So you lose an opportunity to demonstrate your value. 

Cases vary, of course. But I think the trend of 'credential creep' is a side effect of technology, rather than perception.
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#9
(02-27-2019, 05:30 PM)greencouch Wrote: A degree isn't the new HS diploma, but the way businesses collect resumes is changing the landscape of this debate.

10 years ago, you could land a degree-level job if you were able to demonstrate industry experience. So even if I didn't have the 'required' degree, I could still wow them with my resume and portfolio, and land the job. 

But today, more companies rely on computerized pre-filtering of resumes.  If your application doesn't tick certain requirements (like a degree), it's never seen by anyone. So you lose an opportunity to demonstrate your value. 

Cases vary, of course. But I think the trend of 'credential creep' is a side effect of technology, rather than perception.

This is an excellent point and observation.
Simply, you can't always make your case when you're using a form that doesn't allow you to demonstrate anything other than a name, date, and degree.
Unfortunately, I think that's probably not going away, and is just one more reason to network strongly and try and go AROUND the gatekeepers who lack the creativity to evaluate someone in a holistic way.
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#10
It's not a perfect system, but HR can allow the substitution of experience for a degree requirement. They also can allow education to substitute for experience. All it requires is some additional wording or an additional question on the application. I see it all the time.

Example #1: Do you have a bachelor's degree in accounting or four years of full-time accounting experience?

A. Yes
B. No

Example #2: Do you have a bachelor's degree in accounting?

A. Yes
B. No

Do you have four years of experience in accounting?

A. Yes
B. No
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