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Math B.S. to Engineering
#11
(07-16-2021, 05:31 PM)MNomadic Wrote: ASU has an online ABET accredited bachelors in electrical engineering. They're not particularly generous on transferring alternative credits(compared to a lot of schools talked about here), but they accept some CLEPs and things. If you were open to a degree in computer science or engineering technology, your options open up a little bit more.

I looked into ASU. I've seen conflicting information about how many credits they would actually accept, but ultimately it looks like it would be around $38k (best-case scenario and before my employer's reimbursement) to complete my bachelor's. I'm just not willing to go that far into debt. I'm also not really interested in computer science or getting a "technical" engineering degree. Thank you for your suggestions though!

(07-16-2021, 08:59 PM)Alpha Wrote: The University of North Dakota has a bunch of online engineering degrees
Explore 250+ Academic Programs at UND | University of North Dakota

I believe this is the best suggestion (the closest to what I've been looking for) that I've seen. I may apply just to see how my courses would transfer.
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#12
(07-16-2021, 10:30 PM)Silvious Wrote: From your username, I assume you're interested in majoring in ME, the same as I'm. The ultimate goal of any ABET engineering program is to be able to complete the NCEES FE exam. Remember, you could only legally call yourself an Engineer after completing the PE exam 3 years later, even though my thermal-fluid professor allows us to call ourselves an Engineer after completing his course. Taking just 30 engineering credits won't cut it, as one-third of the exams cover static, dynamics, etc stuff from general engineering from sophomore years before branching out to respective disciplines of the major in the junior and senior year.

What you should do now is to grab the NCEES official practice exam and spend a day to seriously do it without the help of the handbook. Figure out which part you already understand/are competent, and which you do not yet know. That should give you an idea of what extra courses you'll need to take.  

Taking a few senior electives won't help with the exam at all, as they often are out of scope for the FE exam, but might get you the degree. You missed the golden age of online engineering for the last 3 semesters, but IMO engineering is best done in person with hands-on training due to the nature of working with actual machinery to complete your projects.

My alma mater is ranked top 10 for ME undergrad and does take 90+ transfer credit and min 30 for the successive degree. While most professors are fed up with online learning and most declare in-person next semester, if the delta strain for covid becomes an issue in NJ then they'll easily bounce back online. There are a few that's still offered remotely, but the content will likely be from last semester, which you should be able to self-pace some if you know the mindset behind the topic (not exceeding 12 weeks of the semester).

For strictly online program, ABET site has a section for 100% online engineering degree programs https://amspub.abet.org/aps/online-search

I'm actually leaning towards EE, but I believe I would enjoy the coursework towards an ME degree more (I think SOLIDWORKS and fluid dynamics are the coolest things in the world).

I think I like your thermal-fluid professor. It's always been a little odd to me that everyone in the engineering major (even the freshmen) were referred to as "one of the engineers." Then there's further confusion as to whether an "engineer" has a technical degree, no degree (as in facilities engineer or sanitation engineer), or is somehow involved with the railroad... 

I think I might be missing the point you're trying to make regarding the FE exam? I worked through one of the EE FE practice exams (on a dare...) and I remember I didn't understand a lot of the questions, but I also remember the math being very easy. I had initially intended to triple major (which is why I'm literally three semesters away from finishing a traditional engineering degree), so I should have a solid foundation to tackle the FE... and as with most people on this forum, I have experience finding learning resources, studying for, and passing standardized exams.

I see the benefit of taking classes in person (and I am afraid of how future employers will view the "online-degree"), but those classes are just not an option.

The link you posted is extremely helpful! Thank You! It doesn't look like every ABET-accredited online program is listed though... I think the University of North Dakota has several online programs that are ABET-accredited, but it isn't on the list.

(07-17-2021, 10:10 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(07-16-2021, 07:07 PM)Mechanical Ibex Wrote:
(07-16-2021, 06:31 PM)dfrecore Wrote: Since it's a 2nd bachelor's degree, you probably just need courses in the major.  You won't need any alt-credit at all.

So I would look for an online degree for the best price per credit, because alt-credit acceptance is moot.

I think you understand my situation perfectly... and perhaps I should update my post to better clarify. 

I should be about 30 credits from the second bachelor's (I have some engineering classes to transfer too, not just math), but I need to find a school that will both accept 90+ transfer credits and also offers the remaining classes online (and preferably self-paced and reasonably priced... but I know I'm dreaming).

You actually don't need to find a school that accepts 90+ transfer credits; you need to find a school that allows transfer into the major.  The 90+ transfer credits is moot (just like the alt-credit).  This is a second bachelor's degree, and you're conflating a first degree policy with a second degree policy - they are not the same.

I would just start to search for online engineering degrees (whichever type of engineering you're looking for), then look at the number of credits left x price per credit to get a price for each school.  Then see if any will allow transfer in the major (some won't).

That's a really helpful piece of information, I've never even heard of a second degree policy. I will search for more information.

I've also never heard of an accredited school willing to confer a degree to a student who has taken fewer than 30 credits from them.
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#13
(07-17-2021, 08:33 PM)Alpha Wrote:
(07-16-2021, 10:30 PM)Silvious Wrote: Remember, you could only legally call yourself an Engineer after completing the PE exam 3 years later, even though my thermal-fluid professor allows us to call ourselves an Engineer after completing his course... 

While this may be true in some places it is not true in most places.  In the US, this is regulated on a state to state basis.  People call themselves Engineers all the time with no consequences.

My bad, I meant to say its illegal to call ourself Professional Engineer or any abbreviation that implies PE without being licensed in at least 1 state, but the PE exam is nationally standardized and you could get your test result transfered/added in other state once you got a 70 in the test. Engineer, in general, is a much wider term, esp in Software where they borrow our branding.

(07-18-2021, 02:45 PM)Mechanical Ibex Wrote: I think I might be missing the point you're trying to make regarding the FE exam? I worked through one of the EE FE practice exams (on a dare...) and I remember I didn't understand a lot of the questions, but I also remember the math being very easy. I had initially intended to triple major (which is why I'm literally three semesters away from finishing a traditional engineering degree), so I should have a solid foundation to tackle the FE... and as with most people on this forum, I have experience finding learning resources, studying for, and passing standardized exams.

If you still have the Practice book in hand, you could see the topic being covered in the book from pages 4-7. You could match every question to one of the 14 topics, where each topic is addressed in one college course. The engineering core curriculum of any ABET school would cover every topic listed before branching out to their own school's specialty. The math is indeed very easy, as it test for all calculus I II and III in 9 questions, plus 6 for stat, but that's just LL knowledge and you should not judge the test from those points giving question. You'll need at least 65-70% depending on disciplines to pass the exam, so make sure you know at least 80% of the materials covered. We were recommended to take the FE before the beginning of our senior year as most stuff is already covered, but the pandemic has pushed that off for me Sad.

For UND case I believe that it does not qualify for 100% online as you still need to come to campus from 1-2 weeks to complete the lab requirement: https://und.edu/programs/mechanical-engi...works.html hence not showing up on the list I sent.

For EE https://und.edu/programs/electrical-engi...works.html they only mention HLC accreditation and not ABET, I suspect that if the program is not listed then it's not yet accredited for 100% online programs.
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#14
ABET's website is not kept current. It took them a couple of years to list Excelsior's engineering technology programs as being online. There's an online master's in safety management that is ABET-accredited and isn't listed as such. It's probably best to work backwards. Find which schools are offering online engineering programs and see which ones are ABET-accredited. I believe it's possible for a campus version to be ABET-accredited while the online version isn't.
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#15
I'm don't know how to quote both of the above posts in a single reply, but I appreciate the information contained in both!

I didn't realize UND's program had an in-person component. I also hadn't considered that a school's in-person engineering degree could be ABET-accredited while the online version was not. That should probably have been obvious... but with schools touting their online degrees as being "exactly the same" and having transcripts that are "indistinguishable" from the brick-and-mortar version, I hadn't considered it.
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