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Schools with very good reputation and good transfer policy?
#41
Program reputations are national. If you can, focus more on the reputation of the department than the school.
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#42
(Yesterday, 02:24 PM)sanantone Wrote: Program reputations are national. If you can, focus more on the reputation of the department than the school.

That depends. Many schools are only known regionally. Few programs are nationally well known. It also depends on the field. If someone gets a degree in something general like liberal studies, it doesn't matter where it comes from. If you want to study music, then there's a huge difference between attending Julliard and Berkley.
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#43
(Yesterday, 02:47 PM)ss20ts Wrote:
(Yesterday, 02:24 PM)sanantone Wrote: Program reputations are national. If you can, focus more on the reputation of the department than the school.

That depends. Many schools are only known regionally. Few programs are nationally well known. It also depends on the field. If someone gets a degree in something general like liberal studies, it doesn't matter where it comes from. If you want to study music, then there's a huge difference between attending Julliard and Berkley.

There's so much people don't know when they're not in a field. Even though I am from Texas, I had no idea that University of North Texas was highly-regarded for jazz because I'm not formally trained in music, and I don't listen to much jazz. I found out that information from someone who lives outside of Texas. Sure enough, they're on almost every list of best jazz programs, and their students get to play with Grammy-nominated acts. I live less than 45 minutes away from the school, and I would have never known.
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AAS, AS, BA, and BS
CLEP
Intro Psych 70, US His I 64, Intro Soc 63, Intro Edu Psych 70, A&I Lit 64, Bio 68, Prin Man 69, Prin Mar 68
DSST
Life Dev Psych 62, Fund Coun 68, Intro Comp 469, Intro Astr 56, Env & Hum 70, HTYH 456, MIS 451, Prin Sup 453, HRM 62, Bus Eth 458
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#44
(Yesterday, 03:43 PM)sanantone Wrote:
(Yesterday, 02:47 PM)ss20ts Wrote:
(Yesterday, 02:24 PM)sanantone Wrote: Program reputations are national. If you can, focus more on the reputation of the department than the school.

That depends. Many schools are only known regionally. Few programs are nationally well known. It also depends on the field. If someone gets a degree in something general like liberal studies, it doesn't matter where it comes from. If you want to study music, then there's a huge difference between attending Julliard and Berkley.

There's so much people don't know when they're not in a field. Even though I am from Texas, I had no idea that University of North Texas was highly-regarded for jazz because I'm not formally trained in music, and I don't listen to much jazz. I found out that information from someone who lives outside of Texas. Sure enough, they're on almost every list of best jazz programs, and their students get to play with Grammy-nominated acts. I live less than 45 minutes away from the school, and I would have never known.

So for a really small niche degree, then national reputation matters - I'm guessing there are very few Jazz programs at all anyway, so everyone involved in the Jazz field (whatever that is) is going to know them all, and may be able to rank the programs.

But for most purposes, a regional reputation is fine.  For someone getting a business degree, if you live in San Diego, whether you get your degree from SDSU or UCSD or CSUSM doesn't matter - they're all perfectly fine institutions, with lots of local alumni in the area. Nobody is going to care which one you went to - but they'll all be a better option regionally than Clemson.  Now, over here in SC, Clemson has a good reputation - as does USC.  Again, if you're getting a business degree from either one, you're fine, nobody cares which one you went to. But you'll have slightly more pull from one of those than if you went to SDSU.

For most degrees, it just doesn't matter.  If you can afford local, that's usually your best option.
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#45
Jazz?  Not quite my tempo!
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#46
(Yesterday, 04:11 PM)dfrecore Wrote:
(Yesterday, 03:43 PM)sanantone Wrote:
(Yesterday, 02:47 PM)ss20ts Wrote:
(Yesterday, 02:24 PM)sanantone Wrote: Program reputations are national. If you can, focus more on the reputation of the department than the school.

That depends. Many schools are only known regionally. Few programs are nationally well known. It also depends on the field. If someone gets a degree in something general like liberal studies, it doesn't matter where it comes from. If you want to study music, then there's a huge difference between attending Julliard and Berkley.

There's so much people don't know when they're not in a field. Even though I am from Texas, I had no idea that University of North Texas was highly-regarded for jazz because I'm not formally trained in music, and I don't listen to much jazz. I found out that information from someone who lives outside of Texas. Sure enough, they're on almost every list of best jazz programs, and their students get to play with Grammy-nominated acts. I live less than 45 minutes away from the school, and I would have never known.

So for a really small niche degree, then national reputation matters - I'm guessing there are very few Jazz programs at all anyway, so everyone involved in the Jazz field (whatever that is) is going to know them all, and may be able to rank the programs.

But for most purposes, a regional reputation is fine.  For someone getting a business degree, if you live in San Diego, whether you get your degree from SDSU or UCSD or CSUSM doesn't matter - they're all perfectly fine institutions, with lots of local alumni in the area. Nobody is going to care which one you went to - but they'll all be a better option regionally than Clemson.  Now, over here in SC, Clemson has a good reputation - as does USC.  Again, if you're getting a business degree from either one, you're fine, nobody cares which one you went to. But you'll have slightly more pull from one of those than if you went to SDSU.

For most degrees, it just doesn't matter.  If you can afford local, that's usually your best option.

There are well over 200 jazz programs in the U.S. This is why it's important to talk to people who have worked, taught, or at least studied within your field of interest. The average person knows nothing about jazz education. I didn't know much about jazz education, and I produce music. 

Local is typically fine if it's more convenient, more within your budget, or if you can't get into a better program. It's just incorrect to say that few programs have national reputations. Just about every field of study has programs with national reputations, and it would be beneficial to have graduated from those programs because you never know when you're going to move. Unless a national or international company is trying to kiss up to local politicians for tax breaks by hiring local graduates, they're not going to automatically prefer a local university over a university several states away with a better reputation in the field. Google was exposed for placing universities into tiers. They have elite, tier 1, and tier 2 based on the rankings of engineering programs. So, people who graduated from a low-ranked or unranked engineering school, even if it was close to a Google satellite location, were getting passed over for people who graduated from high-ranking engineering programs. Google was accused of being racist for rarely hiring HBCU graduates for tech roles, but it wasn't a race thing. There are no HBCUs with high-ranking engineering or computer science programs. Google in Austin will hire someone who graduated from Georgia Tech before they hire someone from Huston-Tillotson University, which is located in Austin. 

People are moving all over the country for jobs, so when you're in a major metro area, you're not just competing with locals. Will you have a better chance of landing a job with a Big 4 accounting firm in the Northeast with a University of Texas at Austin degree over an unranked program in the tri-state area? Yes. Big accounting firms are elitist and so are big law firms. It's verifiable that big accounting firms, no matter where they are headquartered, love hiring University of Texas at Austin graduates. If someone has never worked for a major accounting firm they may not know that, but the people who have and are responsible for hiring know which programs around the country are highly-regarded and which aren't. It's their job to know that. At the end of the day, the people who are doing the hiring, not the general public, are the ones who matter. 

All I'm saying is that attending a highly-regarded program several states away instead of a local program is not going to hurt you; it might actually help you. It all depends on how much you have to spend, how much you want to spend, and whether you can get into the more highly-regarded program. In some cases, the better program might be cheaper anyway. Sometimes, it's good to cross post at subject-specific forums or within subject-specific social media groups so you can get answers from people who work in the field.

When it comes to a liberal studies or general studies degree, I say go anywhere that doesn't have an awful reputation. Liberal studies degrees aren't marketable no matter where you attend, so you'll mostly be relying upon your work experience.

There's no difference between ASU Online and ASU. Your degree will come from the department it is housed in. ASU Online is neither a separate institution nor an extension department. Your business degree will come from the W.P. Carey School of Business at ASU. ASU Online is a website and an administrative distance learning division, not a school that awards degrees.

Will my interdisciplinary arts and performance degree say 'online'?
No, Arizona State University’s diplomas don’t specify whether you earn your degree online or in person. All diplomas and transcripts simply say “Arizona State University.” That’s because ASU Online students learn from the same faculty and receive the same course content as in-person students receive.

https://asuonline.asu.edu/online-degree-...rmance-ba/
PhD (in progress)
MS, MSS and Graduate Cert
AAS, AS, BA, and BS
CLEP
Intro Psych 70, US His I 64, Intro Soc 63, Intro Edu Psych 70, A&I Lit 64, Bio 68, Prin Man 69, Prin Mar 68
DSST
Life Dev Psych 62, Fund Coun 68, Intro Comp 469, Intro Astr 56, Env & Hum 70, HTYH 456, MIS 451, Prin Sup 453, HRM 62, Bus Eth 458
ALEKS
Int Alg, Coll Alg
TEEX
4 credits
TECEP
Fed Inc Tax, Sci of Nutr, Micro, Strat Man, Med Term, Pub Relations
CSU
Sys Analysis & Design, Programming, Cyber
SL
Intro to Comm, Microbio, Acc I
Uexcel
A&P
Davar
Macro, Intro to Fin, Man Acc
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