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36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - Life Long Learning - 09-10-2019

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careersandeducation/36percent-of-young-adults-say-their-college-debt-wasnt-worth-it/ar-AAH2DXc?li=BBnb7Kz


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - Stoic - 09-11-2019

I one hundred percent agree is not worth any type of “debt” at a undergraduate level. We generally forget everything we learn at UG because is not focused enough. Though, a person does learn how to show up to a place on time and how to research and write academic papers at a high level institution. But I’m not sure if that's worth any type of debt.

I think focused master degrees are worth a debt that could be repaid quickly and they do offer massive value due to specification. But yeah, undergrad is BS unless you're going to school for petroleum engineering, maritime engineering, chemical engineering and other type super focused undergrads following this model.


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - ajs1976a - 09-12-2019

pick the right field, put in the work during and after, get experience along the way and some debt may be worth it. The debit some of these students are leaving with is unreal. My kids are in middle school and we are already talking about college debt.


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - amaquiling - 09-13-2019

I'm a young adult myself, but my path is a bit different than others. I attended community college after high school, took a gap year for work, then decided to enroll at TESU. My boyfriend also graduated from community college with me, but took a more traditional path afterwards by enrolling in a 4-year public university. I'd like to think that we both have equally strong work ethics, considering we both hold corporate jobs within our fields, but there are notable differences:
  • I am one of the less financially-savvy TESU students, so I have paid a few thousand dollars to TESU. That being said, he still pays a couple thousand dollars more to his college than me.
  • We are graduating at the same time, but I took a gap year
  • He has been given way more networking opportunities than I have with career fairs, organizations, etc...however, I have the time to do this myself by sitting in on two graduate-level courses this semester
  • He had to cut down his work hours to 25 hours/week, whereas I still work a full 40 hours
Neither of us really regret the decisions we made in terms of our academics. He is further into his career than I am (both CS majors, he is a software engineer while I am a software tester) but as much as we complain about it in our daily lives, we're both pretty well off.

(begin rant)
On the other hand, I've known people who graduated but spent the entire time neglecting their studies for partying and drinking--not saying those activities are inherently bad. Staying social keeps you sane! But when you lose focus on your academics, it feels even worse once you're tens of thousands of dollars in debt and you can't get a decently paying job. After working in corporate for a few months, the disconnect between the academic and corporate worlds are drastically different. I blame a broken educational system for not teaching students how to prioritize well.
(end rant)

All in all, I really think balance, discipline and staying proactive is key to success. Employers are raising the minimum requirements and a Bachelors is almost a necessity in many fields, and college tuition is only increasing. If you take the opportunities that college provides you, it'll definitely be worthwhile.


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - 2L8 - 09-13-2019

(09-13-2019, 09:57 AM)amaquiling Wrote: I'm a young adult myself, but my path is a bit different than others. I attended community college after high school, took a gap year for work, then decided to enroll at TESU. My boyfriend also graduated from community college with me, but took a more traditional path afterwards by enrolling in a 4-year public university. I'd like to think that we both have equally strong work ethics, considering we both hold corporate jobs within our fields, but there are notable differences:
  • I am one of the less financially-savvy TESU students, so I have paid a few thousand dollars to TESU. That being said, he still pays a couple thousand dollars more to his college than me.
  • We are graduating at the same time, but I took a gap year
  • He has been given way more networking opportunities than I have with career fairs, organizations, etc...however, I have the time to do this myself by sitting in on two graduate-level courses this semester
  • He had to cut down his work hours to 25 hours/week, whereas I still work a full 40 hours
Neither of us really regret the decisions we made in terms of our academics. He is further into his career than I am (both CS majors, he is a software engineer while I am a software tester) but as much as we complain about it in our daily lives, we're both pretty well off.

(begin rant)
On the other hand, I've known people who graduated but spent the entire time neglecting their studies for partying and drinking--not saying those activities are inherently bad. Staying social keeps you sane! But when you lose focus on your academics, it feels even worse once you're tens of thousands of dollars in debt and you can't get a decently paying job. After working in corporate for a few months, the disconnect between the academic and corporate worlds are drastically different. I blame a broken educational system for not teaching students how to prioritize well.
(end rant)

All in all, I really think balance, discipline and staying proactive is key to success. Employers are raising the minimum requirements and a Bachelors is almost a necessity in many fields, and college tuition is only increasing. If you take the opportunities that college provides you, it'll definitely be worthwhile.
  I took a gap year as well. I honestly believe the community college is the way to go? Most of my former friends weren't really interested in college but oh " I went to MIT or I went to USC" ,they considered CC , a dummies retreat. CCs are willing to help you IF you put in the work. I attended a seminar and found out there are many different pathways to success. In all honesty I believe that paying for a 4 year intuition is , personally just paying for networking ,then again I'm getting the same thing here at a CC , screw the stigma of community college lol.

 But as for academics , I agree balance is needed. I'm still a student but if you really wanted it you'd find a way to get it.


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - amaquiling - 09-13-2019

(09-13-2019, 10:18 AM)2L8 Wrote:
(09-13-2019, 09:57 AM)amaquiling Wrote: I'm a young adult myself, but my path is a bit different than others. I attended community college after high school, took a gap year for work, then decided to enroll at TESU. My boyfriend also graduated from community college with me, but took a more traditional path afterwards by enrolling in a 4-year public university. I'd like to think that we both have equally strong work ethics, considering we both hold corporate jobs within our fields, but there are notable differences:
  • I am one of the less financially-savvy TESU students, so I have paid a few thousand dollars to TESU. That being said, he still pays a couple thousand dollars more to his college than me.
  • We are graduating at the same time, but I took a gap year
  • He has been given way more networking opportunities than I have with career fairs, organizations, etc...however, I have the time to do this myself by sitting in on two graduate-level courses this semester
  • He had to cut down his work hours to 25 hours/week, whereas I still work a full 40 hours
Neither of us really regret the decisions we made in terms of our academics. He is further into his career than I am (both CS majors, he is a software engineer while I am a software tester) but as much as we complain about it in our daily lives, we're both pretty well off.

(begin rant)
On the other hand, I've known people who graduated but spent the entire time neglecting their studies for partying and drinking--not saying those activities are inherently bad. Staying social keeps you sane! But when you lose focus on your academics, it feels even worse once you're tens of thousands of dollars in debt and you can't get a decently paying job. After working in corporate for a few months, the disconnect between the academic and corporate worlds are drastically different. I blame a broken educational system for not teaching students how to prioritize well.
(end rant)

All in all, I really think balance, discipline and staying proactive is key to success. Employers are raising the minimum requirements and a Bachelors is almost a necessity in many fields, and college tuition is only increasing. If you take the opportunities that college provides you, it'll definitely be worthwhile.
  I took a gap year as well. I honestly believe the community college is the way to go? Most of my former friends weren't really interested in college but oh " I went to MIT or I went to USC" ,they considered CC , a dummies retreat. CCs are willing to help you IF you put in the work. I attended a seminar and found out there are many different pathways to success. In all honesty I believe that paying for a 4 year intuition is , personally just paying for networking ,then again I'm getting the same thing here at a CC , screw the stigma of community college lol.

 But as for academics , I agree balance is needed. I'm still a student but if you really wanted it you'd find a way to get it.

It may be my personal opinion (and bias because of my tech background), but my boyfriend's school (which specializes in tech) is right next to our CC. The networking opportunities are definitely plentiful compared to CC. However, it is probably due to only having a small # of STEM majors at CC...not sure how others are if they are more STEM-focused?


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - natshar - 09-13-2019

Another way of looking at it saying that 64% of students said college debt was worth it some way. It also depends on what field and how much debt you are talking. A friend of mine graduated with 7k in debt and another person I know has about 90k in debt. 7k debt isn't too bad, 90k is a lot too handle.

Not everyone is cut out for or wants to their bachelor's degree online, the big 3 aren't for everyone. For those doing a bachelors degree, the traditional route will likely have some debt.

For me personally, I went to CC and got my associates debt-free working through college. Although worth noting, I would not have been able to do this without living with my parents rent-free. I was going to finish my degree online through TESU but I found amazing and unique opportunity to finish my degree in person in just a year. I will graduate in May with around 8k in debt (possibly less if I get more scholarships). But in my opinion, for me it is already worth it. There are so many things I access to that I wouldn't have access to if I did my degree at TESU.


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - Ideas - 09-14-2019

I think major debt is worth it for certain majors and certain top schools. Particularly if the student networks better than average.


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - cookderosa - 09-14-2019

Is a degree worth getting? Yes. Is debt worth accumulating? That's a personal position- in our home we do not believe in debt TODAY, however, that wasn't always the case, and I think this question mixes up the value of a degree with the presumption of college debt. As if they are a package deal.

I'd be willing to bet 100% of the students who earned a degree with 0% debt would say it was worth it - and that's a much harder path than simply signing your name on a promissory note.


RE: 36% of young adults say their college debt wasn't worth it - natshar - 09-14-2019

(09-14-2019, 07:28 AM)cookderosa Wrote: I'd be willing to bet 100% of the students who earned a degree with 0% debt would say it was worth it - and that's a much harder path than simply signing your name on a promissory note.

love this statement.