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Doctoral Degree
#1
I have been heavily considering my next route of education. I have been contemplating another masters but my ultimate goal is to move into academia therefore at some point a PhD would be beneficial. I have not decided if I want to be a professor or if I would be more apt to be in an administrative position. Other than a PhD in Business, what would be the best PhD to get to achieve this?
_____________________________________________________
Master of Science (MS) - Finance
University of Oklahoma
AACSB-Accredited
Beginning Fall 2019

Master of Business Administration (MBA) - Management
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
AACSB-Accredited
Conferred 2019

Bachelor of Science (BS) - Biology
East Central University
Conferred 2015
Reply
#2
(12-31-2018, 07:52 PM)ThatBankDude Wrote: I have been heavily considering my next route of education. I have been contemplating another masters but my ultimate goal is to move into academia therefore at some point a PhD would be beneficial. I have not decided if I want to be a professor or if I would be more apt to be in an administrative position. Other than a PhD in Business, what would be the best PhD to get to achieve this?

I've been having these same thoughts since I don't plan to limit myself to a bachelors or masters degree. After my MBA I'm considering a second masters degree or just jumping off the deep end and going for the Ph.D., DBA, or DM. I'm also interested in teaching at the postsecondary level, but at my age, I"m not sure how realistic that is since most tenure-track teachers start in their 30s. I should have no problem finding an adjunct teaching position, but I'd need a full-time role to make it feasible. If I get into the CS masters program at GA Tech I will probably do that after the MBA but before moving onto a doctorate. In that case, I might also consider a CS-related Ph.D. instead.

In any case, I've done a fair amount of research in this area. My recommendation: get a Ph.D. if you want to teach and get a DBA if you want to stay in business administration. However, either way, considering the level of work it is going to take and overall costs, I suggest that whatever degree you go for, it should focus on something that you're passionate about since you're going to be doing a lot of research and possibly teaching about it eventually. For me, I'm most interested in the management and leadership aspects of technology (in business), so if I were to go with the DBA or DM it would be in that field. If I did a Ph.D., I'd probably focus in the same area, though I might also look to see what related fields need the most teachers and use that to determine which related subject would give me a better chance at finding a full-time teaching position.

If you decide to focus on postsecondary teaching (college level), keep in mind that you'll want a degree from a research-focused RA university (or a top school in your field), at least if you're hoping to eventually score a tenured position at a decent school. You will generally need an academic credential at least one level higher than the level of students you'll be instructing. So at the community college level, you'll need at least a bachelors degree–though a masters degree is often preferred; at the 4-year college level you'll need at least a masters degree, but many schools require a Ph.D. For adjunct positions, you are usually fine with a bachelors degree or masters degree since its more about your years of career experience, but they are usually paid hourly, and the pay isn't that great in general. My wife is an adjunct professor at a 4-year university, so I'm fairly well versed in this.

That is my $0.02 anyway.
In Progress: MBA in IT Management, Western Governors University (19/35cu | Sep 2019)
Up Next: Perhaps an MSCS or a DBA/DM/Ph.D.

Complete:
BSBA in Computer Information Systems, 2019, Thomas Edison State University
ASNSM in Computer Science, 2019, Thomas Edison State University

B&M CC: 8.68cr, TESU: 3cr, CLEP/DSST: 15cr, Study.com: 57cr, Straighterline: 19cr, ALEKS: 9cr, TEEX: 6cr, The Institutes: 2cr, Sophia: 2cr
(121.68 credits total. 95 credits earned in 10 months, with 45 of those earned in ~3 months)
[-] The following 1 user Likes Merlin's post:
  • ThatBankDude
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#3
(12-31-2018, 08:28 PM)Merlin Wrote:
(12-31-2018, 07:52 PM)ThatBankDude Wrote: I have been heavily considering my next route of education. I have been contemplating another masters but my ultimate goal is to move into academia therefore at some point a PhD would be beneficial. I have not decided if I want to be a professor or if I would be more apt to be in an administrative position. Other than a PhD in Business, what would be the best PhD to get to achieve this?

I've been having these same thoughts since I don't plan to limit myself to a bachelors or masters degree. After my MBA I'm considering a second masters degree or just jumping off the deep end and going for the Ph.D., DBA, or DM. I'm also interested in teaching at the postsecondary level, but at my age, I"m not sure how realistic that is since most tenure-track teachers start in their 30s. I should have no problem finding an adjunct teaching position, but I'd need a full-time role to make it feasible. If I get into the CS masters program at GA Tech I will probably do that after the MBA but before moving onto a doctorate. In that case, I might also consider a CS-related Ph.D. instead.

In any case, I've done a fair amount of research in this area. My recommendation: get a Ph.D. if you want to teach and get a DBA if you want to stay in business administration. However, either way, considering the level of work it is going to take and overall costs, I suggest that whatever degree you go for, it should focus on something that you're passionate about since you're going to be doing a lot of research and possibly teaching about it eventually. For me, I'm most interested in the management and leadership aspects of technology (in business), so if I were to go with the DBA or DM it would be in that field. If I did a Ph.D., I'd probably focus in the same area, though I might also look to see what related fields need the most teachers and use that to determine which related subject would give me a better chance at finding a full-time teaching position.

If you decide to focus on postsecondary teaching (college level), keep in mind that you'll want a degree from a research-focused RA university (or a top school in your field), at least if you're hoping to eventually score a tenured position at a decent school. You will generally need an academic credential at least one level higher than the level of students you'll be instructing. So at the community college level, you'll need at least a bachelors degree–though a masters degree is often preferred; at the 4-year college level you'll need at least a masters degree, but many schools require a Ph.D. For adjunct positions, you are usually fine with a bachelors degree or masters degree since its more about your years of career experience, but they are usually paid hourly, and the pay isn't that great in general. My wife is an adjunct professor at a 4-year university, so I'm fairly well versed in this.

That is my $0.02 anyway.

I am almost certain I would pursue a PhD versus a DBA or DM. I am 26 with about 2 years of management experience. I am about 95% certain that in April 2019 I will be promoted to AVP or VP with the bank I work at. My MBA concentration is management and if I did a PhD in Business I would be more apt to stick with that specialty. That said, I have also considered a PhD in Higher Education Leadership in an effort to assist me in moving into an administrative position at a university.
_____________________________________________________
Master of Science (MS) - Finance
University of Oklahoma
AACSB-Accredited
Beginning Fall 2019

Master of Business Administration (MBA) - Management
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
AACSB-Accredited
Conferred 2019

Bachelor of Science (BS) - Biology
East Central University
Conferred 2015
Reply
#4
(12-31-2018, 08:39 PM)ThatBankDude Wrote:
(12-31-2018, 08:28 PM)Merlin Wrote:
(12-31-2018, 07:52 PM)ThatBankDude Wrote: I have been heavily considering my next route of education. I have been contemplating another masters but my ultimate goal is to move into academia therefore at some point a PhD would be beneficial. I have not decided if I want to be a professor or if I would be more apt to be in an administrative position. Other than a PhD in Business, what would be the best PhD to get to achieve this?

I've been having these same thoughts since I don't plan to limit myself to a bachelors or masters degree. After my MBA I'm considering a second masters degree or just jumping off the deep end and going for the Ph.D., DBA, or DM. I'm also interested in teaching at the postsecondary level, but at my age, I"m not sure how realistic that is since most tenure-track teachers start in their 30s. I should have no problem finding an adjunct teaching position, but I'd need a full-time role to make it feasible. If I get into the CS masters program at GA Tech I will probably do that after the MBA but before moving onto a doctorate. In that case, I might also consider a CS-related Ph.D. instead.

In any case, I've done a fair amount of research in this area. My recommendation: get a Ph.D. if you want to teach and get a DBA if you want to stay in business administration. However, either way, considering the level of work it is going to take and overall costs, I suggest that whatever degree you go for, it should focus on something that you're passionate about since you're going to be doing a lot of research and possibly teaching about it eventually. For me, I'm most interested in the management and leadership aspects of technology (in business), so if I were to go with the DBA or DM it would be in that field. If I did a Ph.D., I'd probably focus in the same area, though I might also look to see what related fields need the most teachers and use that to determine which related subject would give me a better chance at finding a full-time teaching position.

If you decide to focus on postsecondary teaching (college level), keep in mind that you'll want a degree from a research-focused RA university (or a top school in your field), at least if you're hoping to eventually score a tenured position at a decent school. You will generally need an academic credential at least one level higher than the level of students you'll be instructing. So at the community college level, you'll need at least a bachelors degree–though a masters degree is often preferred; at the 4-year college level you'll need at least a masters degree, but many schools require a Ph.D. For adjunct positions, you are usually fine with a bachelors degree or masters degree since its more about your years of career experience, but they are usually paid hourly, and the pay isn't that great in general. My wife is an adjunct professor at a 4-year university, so I'm fairly well versed in this.

That is my $0.02 anyway.

I am almost certain I would pursue a PhD versus a DBA or DM. I am 26 with about 2 years of management experience. I am about 95% certain that in April 2019 I will be promoted to AVP or VP with the bank I work at. My MBA concentration is management and if I did a PhD in Business I would be more apt to stick with that specialty. That said, I have also considered a PhD in Higher Education Leadership in an effort to assist me in moving into an administrative position at a university.

If you're interested in working in academia but not teaching, then your options are more open. Your MBA would probably be fine there since a lot of administrators in colleges are not doctorate holders, though having a doctorate could be useful depending on the role you're seeking. A degree specifically in education for administrative jobs seems ideal. Though I'd argue that a DBA could be just as valuable depending on what kind of role within the school you are trying to pursue. That said, I'd think that a management focus would probably be the least in-demand specialization in administration unless you're looking for a leadership role of some kind. For that, you'd probably need to supplement your resume with academic experience in other areas.

At your age, I'd think postsecondary teaching would be the best path. Assuming you spend 5 years on your Ph.D. and defense (and it could be half that time depending on the topic and school), you'll end up coming out of it by 30-32, which is the perfect age for starting a tenure-track teaching career. You can always go into administration after that if you don't like it, or if it doesn't end up working out the way you like. Plus having hands-on experience as an educator first would make you a better administrator.

I'm just under double your age, so by the time I end up with a Ph.D., I'd be in my mid-50s going up against 30-something folks for teaching roles. Administration roles seem like they would probably be a better option in my case, but I'm less interested in that side and more interested in either teaching or creating courses. That or doing pure academic research of some kind; this seems like it could be very interesting and rewarding...depending on the subject area anyway.
In Progress: MBA in IT Management, Western Governors University (19/35cu | Sep 2019)
Up Next: Perhaps an MSCS or a DBA/DM/Ph.D.

Complete:
BSBA in Computer Information Systems, 2019, Thomas Edison State University
ASNSM in Computer Science, 2019, Thomas Edison State University

B&M CC: 8.68cr, TESU: 3cr, CLEP/DSST: 15cr, Study.com: 57cr, Straighterline: 19cr, ALEKS: 9cr, TEEX: 6cr, The Institutes: 2cr, Sophia: 2cr
(121.68 credits total. 95 credits earned in 10 months, with 45 of those earned in ~3 months)
[-] The following 1 user Likes Merlin's post:
  • ThatBankDude
Reply
#5
(12-31-2018, 09:15 PM)Merlin Wrote:
(12-31-2018, 08:39 PM)ThatBankDude Wrote:
(12-31-2018, 08:28 PM)Merlin Wrote:
(12-31-2018, 07:52 PM)ThatBankDude Wrote: I have been heavily considering my next route of education. I have been contemplating another masters but my ultimate goal is to move into academia therefore at some point a PhD would be beneficial. I have not decided if I want to be a professor or if I would be more apt to be in an administrative position. Other than a PhD in Business, what would be the best PhD to get to achieve this?

I've been having these same thoughts since I don't plan to limit myself to a bachelors or masters degree. After my MBA I'm considering a second masters degree or just jumping off the deep end and going for the Ph.D., DBA, or DM. I'm also interested in teaching at the postsecondary level, but at my age, I"m not sure how realistic that is since most tenure-track teachers start in their 30s. I should have no problem finding an adjunct teaching position, but I'd need a full-time role to make it feasible. If I get into the CS masters program at GA Tech I will probably do that after the MBA but before moving onto a doctorate. In that case, I might also consider a CS-related Ph.D. instead.

In any case, I've done a fair amount of research in this area. My recommendation: get a Ph.D. if you want to teach and get a DBA if you want to stay in business administration. However, either way, considering the level of work it is going to take and overall costs, I suggest that whatever degree you go for, it should focus on something that you're passionate about since you're going to be doing a lot of research and possibly teaching about it eventually. For me, I'm most interested in the management and leadership aspects of technology (in business), so if I were to go with the DBA or DM it would be in that field. If I did a Ph.D., I'd probably focus in the same area, though I might also look to see what related fields need the most teachers and use that to determine which related subject would give me a better chance at finding a full-time teaching position.

If you decide to focus on postsecondary teaching (college level), keep in mind that you'll want a degree from a research-focused RA university (or a top school in your field), at least if you're hoping to eventually score a tenured position at a decent school. You will generally need an academic credential at least one level higher than the level of students you'll be instructing. So at the community college level, you'll need at least a bachelors degree–though a masters degree is often preferred; at the 4-year college level you'll need at least a masters degree, but many schools require a Ph.D. For adjunct positions, you are usually fine with a bachelors degree or masters degree since its more about your years of career experience, but they are usually paid hourly, and the pay isn't that great in general. My wife is an adjunct professor at a 4-year university, so I'm fairly well versed in this.

That is my $0.02 anyway.

I am almost certain I would pursue a PhD versus a DBA or DM. I am 26 with about 2 years of management experience. I am about 95% certain that in April 2019 I will be promoted to AVP or VP with the bank I work at. My MBA concentration is management and if I did a PhD in Business I would be more apt to stick with that specialty. That said, I have also considered a PhD in Higher Education Leadership in an effort to assist me in moving into an administrative position at a university.

If you're interested in working in academia but not teaching, then your options are more open. Your MBA would probably be fine there since a lot of administrators in colleges are not doctorate holders, though having a doctorate could be useful depending on the role you're seeking. A degree specifically in education for administrative jobs seems ideal. Though I'd argue that a DBA could be just as valuable depending on what kind of role within the school you are trying to pursue. That said, I'd think that a management focus would probably be the least in-demand specialization in administration unless you're looking for a leadership role of some kind. For that, you'd probably need to supplement your resume with academic experience in other areas.

At your age, I'd think postsecondary teaching would be the best path. Assuming you spend 5 years on your Ph.D. and defense (and it could be half that time depending on the topic and school), you'll end up coming out of it by 30-32, which is the perfect age for starting a tenure-track teaching career. You can always go into administration after that if you don't like it, or if it doesn't end up working out the way you like. Plus having hands-on experience as an educator first would make you a better administrator.

I'm just under double your age, so by the time I end up with a Ph.D., I'd be in my mid-50s going up against 30-something folks for teaching roles. Administration roles seem like they would probably be a better option in my case, but I'm less interested in that side and more interested in either teaching or creating courses. That or doing pure academic research of some kind; this seems like it could be very interesting and rewarding...depending on the subject area anyway.

Management would definitely be one field that likely has the least demand in business. Other than that, finance is the only thing that interest me. I hated accounting. Business analytics is not the most interesting thing to me. So ultimately it is a PhD in Business with a concentration on management, a MS in Finance followed by a PhD in Finance, or a PhD in Higher Education Leadership. Gahhh the decisions!

As for you, I do not think your age should limit you from pursuing, and achieving, your goals! I say go for it!
_____________________________________________________
Master of Science (MS) - Finance
University of Oklahoma
AACSB-Accredited
Beginning Fall 2019

Master of Business Administration (MBA) - Management
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
AACSB-Accredited
Conferred 2019

Bachelor of Science (BS) - Biology
East Central University
Conferred 2015
Reply
#6
(12-31-2018, 09:23 PM)ThatBankDude Wrote: As for you, I do not think your age should limit you from pursuing, and achieving, your goals! I say go for it!

Oh, it won't deter me from anything. It is just something I need to consider when making these decisions. Smile
In Progress: MBA in IT Management, Western Governors University (19/35cu | Sep 2019)
Up Next: Perhaps an MSCS or a DBA/DM/Ph.D.

Complete:
BSBA in Computer Information Systems, 2019, Thomas Edison State University
ASNSM in Computer Science, 2019, Thomas Edison State University

B&M CC: 8.68cr, TESU: 3cr, CLEP/DSST: 15cr, Study.com: 57cr, Straighterline: 19cr, ALEKS: 9cr, TEEX: 6cr, The Institutes: 2cr, Sophia: 2cr
(121.68 credits total. 95 credits earned in 10 months, with 45 of those earned in ~3 months)
[-] The following 1 user Likes Merlin's post:
  • ThatBankDude
Reply
#7
Choosing a field in which one would pursue a doctorate is not a casual decision. "Gee, which PhD would get me a job?" is not the question. "What do I want to be the rest of my life?" is a better one, because getting a PhD (or other doctorate) is going to define you and your career from then on.

Pursue an academic doctorate if you want to be an academic. Pursue a professional doctorate if you want to advance in your non-academic field.

But here's the real issue: it isn't the degree, it's the process. You can earn a scholarly PhD and have absolutely no shot at an academic career if you don't take the traditional route. You will not have been part of the academic community, you will not have have presented at symposia, written and published academic papers, have been mentored by faculty members, etc.

There is a lot of literature on how to move from academia to the public or private sector. There is nothing about making the move the other way. Why? Because they don't want you. You can have tons of experience and a scholarly doctorate from a good school and it just won't matter. You're not one of them. Are there exceptions? Sure. If someone at a school really wants to hire you, having that degree will keep a door from being slammed shut. But if you think having a PhD is going to lead you from the private sector or government into academia, you're being naive.
Reply
#8
(01-29-2019, 08:08 PM)Sagan Wrote: Choosing a field in which one would pursue a doctorate is not a casual decision. "Gee, which PhD would get me a job?" is not the question. "What do I want to be the rest of my life?" is a better one, because getting a PhD (or other doctorate) is going to define you and your career from then on.

Pursue an academic doctorate if you want to be an academic. Pursue a professional doctorate if you want to advance in your non-academic field.

But here's the real issue: it isn't the degree, it's the process. You can earn a scholarly PhD and have absolutely no shot at an academic career if you don't take the traditional route. You will not have been part of the academic community, you will not have have presented at symposia, written and published academic papers, have been mentored by faculty members, etc.

There is a lot of literature on how to move from academia to the public or private sector. There is nothing about making the move the other way. Why? Because they don't want you. You can have tons of experience and a scholarly doctorate from a good school and it just won't matter. You're not one of them. Are there exceptions? Sure. If someone at a school really wants to hire you, having that degree will keep a door from being slammed shut. But if you think having a PhD is going to lead you from the private sector or government into academia, you're being naive.

If you post this on Degreeinfo.com, you will get an earful. 

I've made a couple of sensitive cops angry because I told them that their PhD choices will limit their options. However, I didn't tell them that they wouldn't get work because they will. There are many people with online PhDs teaching criminal justice courses at community colleges. There are also many who are adjunct instructors. But, my focus wasn't on whether or not the program was online because plenty of people in online programs have published and presented at conferences. My focus was the particular school and whether or not hiring committees will view it as being non-traditional. Otherwise, they don't know if you went to school online.
PhD (in progress)
Masters and Graduate Certificate
AAS, AS, BA, and BS
CLEP
Intro Psych 70, US His I 64, Intro Soc 63, Intro Edu Psych 70, A&I Lit 64, Bio 68, Prin Man 69, Prin Mar 68
DSST
Life Dev Psych 62, Fund Coun 68, Intro Comp 469, Intro Astr 56, Env & Hum 70, HTYH 456, MIS 451, Prin Sup 453, HRM 62, Bus Eth 458
ALEKS
Int Alg, Coll Alg
TEEX
4 credits
TECEP
Fed Inc Tax, Sci of Nutr, Micro, Strat Man, Med Term, Pub Relations
CSU
Sys Analysis & Design, Programming, Cyber
SL
Intro to Comm, Microbio, Acc I
Uexcel
A&P
Davar
Macro, Intro to Fin, Man Acc
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