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Smartphone Addiction
#11
(01-17-2019, 07:36 PM)sanantone Wrote: Most payphones are gone; I can't remember the last time I've seen one. I would go as far as to say that it's kind of dangerous to travel without a cell phone. I wouldn't go hiking in the woods without a cell phone. If you fall and break something, you'll have to wait for other hikers to come by. If you're driving in the middle of nowhere, and your car breaks down, you're going to have to wait for someone to drive by to ask for help. Even if you're driving in the city at night, since there are no payphones, it would be dangerous to walk around looking for a phone to use.  

I agree.  When I was growing up, there were pay phones everywhere (school, street corners, stores, gas stations, the mall, the movie theater, etc.).  Everywhere I could possibly be had a pay phone nearby.

Now, you have to have a cell phone - but maybe not a smart phone (a dumb one will work too in an emergency).  But honestly, now that my kid is driving, I like knowing that not only does she have a phone with her, but GPS as well.  She's gotten turned around a few times at night, and just pulled over, plugged in her destination, and was on her way in seconds.  And if something happens, like she runs out of gas or gets a flat tire, she doesn't have to get out of the car to contact me.  I've had car trouble and actually had to walk on the side of a very busy freeway to get to the phone.  I'm very glad my kid doesn't have to worry about this.

I know, off track.  But in today's world of no pay phones, I can't imagine not having a cell phone.
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#12
(01-17-2019, 06:37 PM)natshar Wrote:
(01-17-2019, 05:19 PM)cookderosa Wrote:
(01-16-2019, 10:28 PM)natshar Wrote: I'm just wondering if anyone has any thoughts on how to combat smartphone addiction? What do you do (or not do) to be on or use your phone more efficiency and purposely? Or are you addicted to your phone and don't care or do anything to change it? Let me know your thoughts.

I don't have a cell phone- at all - never have, so I told my kids if they wanted one they had to figure it out and pay for it.  They've all managed to pay for iphones and service (I don't know the first thing about it) and are as addicted as any teen.  

It makes me absolutely crazy to try and have a conversation with someone and they stop to look at their phone or even worse, a phone AT MY DINNER TABLE (ohhhhh don't even think about it) but I have no idea.  

I know myself, and I do 100% of my work in front of a pc screen, while it was just a coincidence that I didn't have a phone initially, now I'm determined to not get one because I refuse to be locked to a screen when I'm NOT working.  I don't have a laptop either-  I don't know- it's such a distracting problem, I hope we find a balance as a society.  It's almost pathetic to watch b/c it's so normal that people don't even know they're addicted.

*GASP* I didn't even know people without a cell phone still existed! But seriously that is rare most Americans these days have some sort of cell phone, even if it's just a flip phone. You do at least have a home phone right? People have to contact you somehow.


I'm not sure how people young these days can function with a cell phone. Some jobs and schools even require a phone for the work, and if you don't have one, it makes life significantly more difficult. For example, my last job used a messaging app to communicate and I think it would be difficult to do this without a smartphone. My friends on college campuses remarked that when people want to hang out they post their plans or opportunities to meetup on snapchat, twitter, facebook, etc. Even the colleges themselves are forgoing billboards and paper signage for events and posting on social media instead. People on college campuses have told me that, ironically, if you don't a smartphone you might be spending more time alone, due to missed opportunities. My sister is in college and on the executive board of a student group on campus which requires she has constant access to a facebook group and a few other apps for keeping track of finances and meetings and things. For young people, the world is designed for those who own smartphones. Many people have told me it isn't possible for them give up their smartphone, because work, school, hobbies, etc, basically require it.

I have a landline, yes. People can call me lol. I even have an answering machine, so if I'm not at home they can leave a message.
I don't need a phone- I teach at a college and am an author. None of which requires a phone. I use social media daily - posting on my twitter, FB, website and inside my 50 facebook groups, roughly 100+ interactions daily - still don't need a phone.
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#13
(01-18-2019, 09:21 AM)cookderosa Wrote: I have a landline, yes.  People can call me lol.  I even have an answering machine, so if I'm not at home they can leave a message.
I don't need a phone- I teach at a college and am an author. None of which requires a phone.  I use social media daily -  posting on my twitter, FB, website and inside my 50 facebook groups, roughly 100+ interactions daily - still don't need a phone.

Ok, so what are you going to do if your car breaks down one day?  I'm totally curious!
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#14
You should check out Cal Newport. I've read (you could basically say studied) his book Deep Work, which is a masterpiece as an efficient productivity system. He is releasing his new book called Digital Minimalism in a few weeks, which precisely tackles the modern issue of technology negatively affecting our productivity and lives.

He also has a blog, with the general points vaguely scattered accross it. I'd suggest the books though, since they're (at least Deep Work, and judging from the table of contents of Digital Minimalism) well-organized and very thorough.
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#15
(01-18-2019, 09:34 PM)pws Wrote: You should check out Cal Newport. I've read (you could basically say studied) his book Deep Work, which is a masterpiece as an efficient productivity system. He is releasing his new book called Digital Minimalism in a few weeks, which precisely tackles the modern issue of technology negatively affecting our productivity and lives.

He also has a blog, with the general points vaguely scattered accross it. I'd suggest the books though, since they're (at least Deep Work, and judging from the table of contents of Digital Minimalism) well-organized and very thorough.

That's funny. I've read similar books so Deep Work has been recommended before I'll probably start reading Deep Work tomorrow or the day after.
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#16
(01-18-2019, 11:25 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(01-18-2019, 09:21 AM)cookderosa Wrote: I have a landline, yes.  People can call me lol.  I even have an answering machine, so if I'm not at home they can leave a message.
I don't need a phone- I teach at a college and am an author. None of which requires a phone.  I use social media daily -  posting on my twitter, FB, website and inside my 50 facebook groups, roughly 100+ interactions daily - still don't need a phone.

Ok, so what are you going to do if your car breaks down one day?  I'm totally curious!

Well, I've been a driver for over 30 years and have had my car break down exactly twice. Once as a teen (long before cell phones) and once in the parking lot of Target last year. I went inside and asked customer service if I could use the phone, and I called my husband. My husband has been driving the same number of years, he's broken down twice - both before cell phones. None of my kids have ever broken down - collective years driving about 15. My small sample is a rate of 4 breakdowns over 75 years. I like my odds.
BUT, if I decide to get a phone I will, but I'm not going to make up potential crisis if I don't have one to justify getting one. I just don't need one- if I felt like I did, I would get one.
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#17
(01-18-2019, 10:24 PM)cookderosa Wrote:
(01-18-2019, 11:25 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(01-18-2019, 09:21 AM)cookderosa Wrote: I have a landline, yes.  People can call me lol.  I even have an answering machine, so if I'm not at home they can leave a message.
I don't need a phone- I teach at a college and am an author. None of which requires a phone.  I use social media daily -  posting on my twitter, FB, website and inside my 50 facebook groups, roughly 100+ interactions daily - still don't need a phone.

Ok, so what are you going to do if your car breaks down one day?  I'm totally curious!

Well, I've been a driver for over 30 years and have had my car break down exactly twice. Once as a teen (long before cell phones) and once in the parking lot of Target last year.  I went inside and asked customer service if I could use the phone, and I called my husband.  My husband has been driving the same number of years, he's broken down twice - both before cell phones.  None of my kids have ever broken down - collective years driving about 15.  My small sample is a rate of  4 breakdowns over 75 years.  I like my odds.  
BUT, if I decide to get a phone I will, but I'm not going to make up potential crisis if I don't have one to justify getting one.  I just don't need one- if I felt like I did, I would get one.

Your rate is better than mine!  I ran out of gas twice in a week last year (turns out the gas gauge was faulty).  Battery died year before in a dark parking lot after hours.  My husband got into a car accident on the freeway a couple of years ago.  Each time, phone was needed, we weren't anywhere near a phone.

But I get your point.
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#18
(01-19-2019, 01:48 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(01-18-2019, 10:24 PM)cookderosa Wrote:
(01-18-2019, 11:25 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(01-18-2019, 09:21 AM)cookderosa Wrote: I have a landline, yes.  People can call me lol.  I even have an answering machine, so if I'm not at home they can leave a message.
I don't need a phone- I teach at a college and am an author. None of which requires a phone.  I use social media daily -  posting on my twitter, FB, website and inside my 50 facebook groups, roughly 100+ interactions daily - still don't need a phone.

Ok, so what are you going to do if your car breaks down one day?  I'm totally curious!

Well, I've been a driver for over 30 years and have had my car break down exactly twice. Once as a teen (long before cell phones) and once in the parking lot of Target last year.  I went inside and asked customer service if I could use the phone, and I called my husband.  My husband has been driving the same number of years, he's broken down twice - both before cell phones.  None of my kids have ever broken down - collective years driving about 15.  My small sample is a rate of  4 breakdowns over 75 years.  I like my odds.  
BUT, if I decide to get a phone I will, but I'm not going to make up potential crisis if I don't have one to justify getting one.  I just don't need one- if I felt like I did, I would get one.

Your rate is better than mine!  I ran out of gas twice in a week last year (turns out the gas gauge was faulty).  Battery died year before in a dark parking lot after hours.  My husband got into a car accident on the freeway a couple of years ago.  Each time, phone was needed, we weren't anywhere near a phone.

But I get your point.

The necessity for a cellphone for emergencies notwithstanding, the GPS on my phone has also saved my butt on several occasions. There have also been times when I needed to access an important document or to look up something for work or taxes or whatnot, and being able to pull up Dropbox or a web browser on my phone has been a lifesaver.

I don't always need my smartphone, but the times when I do more than make up for the costs associated with owning the phone.
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#19
(01-19-2019, 03:03 AM)Merlin Wrote: The necessity for a cellphone for emergencies notwithstanding, the GPS on my phone has also saved my butt on several occasions. There have also been times when I needed to access an important document or to look up something for work or taxes or whatnot, and being able to pull up Dropbox or a web browser on my phone has been a lifesaver.

I don't always need my smartphone, but the times when I do more than make up for the costs associated with owning the phone.

I also have found this true. In fact, just a few weeks ago, my family found ourselves on the shoulder of a freeway with car troubles that made it so we couldn't drive at all. We were far from anywhere with a phone in the middle of the night. We called a tow truck and used our phones to order an uber to take us to a car repair place (which we located using google maps) and then met the tow truck there to get our car fixed the next morning. We then googled and used priceline to book the cheapest nearby hotel, which we ubered to. 

Obviously, things like that have probably happened before smartphones, but I know for a fact owning a smartphone in that instance made everything way easier. I'm not sure how we would have managed without any phone at all.
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#20
(01-19-2019, 02:44 PM)natshar Wrote:
(01-19-2019, 03:03 AM)Merlin Wrote: The necessity for a cellphone for emergencies notwithstanding, the GPS on my phone has also saved my butt on several occasions. There have also been times when I needed to access an important document or to look up something for work or taxes or whatnot, and being able to pull up Dropbox or a web browser on my phone has been a lifesaver.

I don't always need my smartphone, but the times when I do more than make up for the costs associated with owning the phone.

I also have found this true. In fact, just a few weeks ago, my family found ourselves on the shoulder of a freeway with car troubles that made it so we couldn't drive at all. We were far from anywhere with a phone in the middle of the night. We called a tow truck and used our phones to order an uber to take us to a car repair place (which we located using google maps) and then met the tow truck there to get our car fixed the next morning. We then googled and used priceline to book the cheapest nearby hotel, which we ubered to. 

Obviously, things like that have probably happened before smartphones, but I know for a fact owning a smartphone in that instance made everything way easier. I'm not sure how we would have managed without any phone at all.

I remember the days when most did not have a cell phone. In the past, there were fewer places that were open 24/7. Even now, most places are closed after 10 pm. Without a cell phone, if you broke down or got into an accident that disabled your vehicle, you'd walk to the nearest business to use their phone. If you had change, then you could use a payphone. If there were no businesses around, you'd walk to someone's house and ask for help. If there were no businesses or houses around, you'd wave down a vehicle and hope they weren't a rapist or serial killer. 

Before everyone had cell phones, I remember seeing a lot of people walking on the side of the highway trying to get to a gas station, which is quite dangerous.
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