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Bad Bad Vibes from WGU (and an Intro of sorts)
#31
(11-05-2019, 12:11 PM)JoshDosMil Wrote: Yikes, I think the problem is a combination of lack of planning and an unrealistic expectation that the school would help you get credits from anywhere but itself. I actually went though this exact same process between excelsior, cosc, and wgu (I had NA credits so TESU wasn't an option) but quickly realized that nobody was going to be any real help, so I did my own research between here/reddit and made out with a "check this box" BS like a bandit.

I will say my enrollment counselor was a pure salesman, very pushy and persistent. Don't let a counselors motivation cloud your own, I just avoided my counselor until I was ready to send in my ACE credits for evaluation (I did this 3 times before enrolling).

As for as planning goes, you as the student and person paying for the program are the responsible party. It is important to do your own research regardless of school, WGU has very strict degree plans so transfer credit only works well with careful planning. Generic credits will not transfer well to any WGU program as they don't have many general ed classes. If what you have is a random assortment of credits or a ton of gen eds - about 5 minutes of research (I research buying a new toothbrush longer than that) would tell you that WGU isn't a good option for that type of transfer.

Having said that, if done correctly they are generous with transfer credit, as long as it is a similar class name to what exists on their degree plan. I took many SDC/ACE classes that were not listed on the "wgu transfer pathway" but every single one of them transferred anyways (some LL even transferred in for classes that usually require UL).

For details you can search out my past post from a couple months ago, the short story is I knocked out a bunch of ACE classes and transferred 90 credits to WGU and completed in like 3 or so months for a total cost of under 5K (that includes all money spent on alternative credit, paperwork, and supplies).

In reality none of these schools are going to go out of their way to try and help you get credits from other sources, in my experience none of them are particularly helpful in any way- so that bit is up to you and if done correctly all 4 schools are good options.
My thoughts exactly. They tuck that information away nicely. I had the exact same experience. Pushy, presumptuous, almost as if he had a "Handling Objections" script from Boiler Room. Still can't get over this guy trying to deter me from taking Saylor courses before starting (before I knew about the college I'm at now).

Nobody on this forum can justify why WGU would have such a predatory policy to restrict any and all transfer credits after you enroll (especially if it meets their own Transfer Pathways list they have on their website listing Saylor Academy courses they accept). No, you could have a single class left and they'd make you shell out a grand for it if you can't make for an extension. They would not let you finish a $25 Saylor Academy credit in this instance.

I may as well update where I'm at now. I'm now at UMPI after dealing with the utter headache that is TESU. There is no policy against transferring in credits post-enrollment. So far, nothing but good experiences. Comparably, this is a University recognized for graduating people with much lower debt. When they first gave me my aid package they didn't even offer my max Stafford loans, I had to request it.

Despite my "bad vibes" against WGU, I can't in good conscience say it's not a place you shouldn't consider so long as you know their policies, which they sure will not inform you of until you push and prod it out of them. My point is, you shouldn't have to, and does not seem indicative of a university interested in graduating you with the least amount of debt. If price is important, I'd recommend someone WGU only if they can get as close to 90 credits as possible and be prepared to really go to work the next 6 months to wrap up the remaining 30.
#32
Ivythrowaway, nobody is bothering to defend the practice because you've provided no evidence that it's "predatory" other than that you don't like it
Link to all credits earned: Link
#33
(11-06-2019, 10:31 AM)mysonx3 Wrote: Ivythrowaway, nobody is bothering to defend the practice because you've provided no evidence that it's "predatory" other than that you don't like it

That was literally my last post, confirming the poster before me. Can you not read?
#34
(11-05-2019, 12:11 PM)JoshDosMil Wrote: Yikes, I think the problem is a combination of lack of planning and an unrealistic expectation that the school would help you get credits from anywhere but itself.  I actually went though this exact same process between excelsior, cosc, and wgu (I had NA credits so TESU wasn't an option) but quickly realized that nobody was going to be any real help, so I did my own research between here/reddit and made out with a "check this box" BS like a bandit.

I will say my enrollment counselor was a pure salesman, very pushy and persistent. Don't let a counselors motivation cloud your own, I just avoided my counselor until I was ready to send in my ACE credits for evaluation (I did this 3 times before enrolling).

As for as planning goes, you as the student and person paying for the program are the responsible party. It is important to do your own research regardless of school, WGU has very strict degree plans so transfer credit only works well with careful planning. Generic credits will not transfer well to any WGU program as they don't have many general ed classes. If what you have is a random assortment of credits or a ton of gen eds - about 5 minutes of research (I research buying a new toothbrush longer than that) would tell you that WGU isn't a good option for that type of transfer.

Having said that, if done correctly they are generous with transfer credit, as long as it is a similar class name to what exists on their degree plan. I took many SDC/ACE classes that were not listed on the "wgu transfer pathway" but every single one of them transferred anyways (some LL even transferred in for classes that usually require UL).

For details you can search out my past post from a couple months ago, the short story is I knocked out a bunch of ACE classes and transferred 90 credits to WGU and completed in like 3 or so months for a total cost of under 5K (that includes all money spent on alternative credit, paperwork, and supplies).

In reality none of these schools are going to go out of their way to try and help you get credits from other sources, in my experience none of them are particularly helpful in any way- so that bit is up to you and if done correctly all 4 schools are good options.

Yeah, I'm waffling between WGU and COSC. Like you, I'm just seeking a "check the box" degree. I dont really care where its from. But both schools have their benefits and flaws. There are many factors that come into play, speed of completion, price, what the school allows for transfer credit...etc.
#35
(11-06-2019, 10:59 AM)ivythrowaway Wrote:
(11-06-2019, 10:31 AM)mysonx3 Wrote: Ivythrowaway, nobody is bothering to defend the practice because you've provided no evidence that it's "predatory" other than that you don't like it

That was literally my last post, confirming the poster before me. Can you not read?

That's not an argument for why it's predatory. You literally just stated what the policy is.
Link to all credits earned: Link
#36
The argument was: "No, you could have a single class left and they'd make you shell out a grand for it if you can't make for an extension. They would not let you finish a $25 Saylor Academy credit in this instance."

How is this not predatory? Where in most cases you need to shell out around a grand to finish a degree that few, if any, other universities will accept credit for. This is literally the only institution I know of besides possibly every for-profit school that has a policy. The argument was that the policy is inherently predatory in addition to their dated Boiler Room sales tactics that JoshDosMil also observed. You make me think TESU should have an elementary logic course available. Just $400 more than a grand would get you an entire term at UMPI or almost half of what it'd cost to finish at COSC.

But I guess you also missed the part where I said WGU is something people should still consider while being aware of their culture and asinine policies. Max out near 90 credits I said, and hedge against having to deal with what is a b******t and absolutely predatory policy.
#37
(11-06-2019, 10:29 PM)ivythrowaway Wrote: The argument was: "No, you could have a single class left and they'd make you shell out a grand for it if you can't make for an extension. They would not let you finish a $25 Saylor Academy credit in this instance."

How is this not predatory? Where in most cases you need to shell out around a grand to finish a degree that few, if any, other universities will accept credit for. This is literally the only institution I know of besides possibly every for-profit school that has a policy. The argument was that the policy is inherently predatory in addition to their dated Boiler Room sales tactics that JoshDosMil also observed. You make me think TESU should have an elementary logic course available. Just $400 more than a grand would get you an entire term at UMPI or almost half of what it'd cost to finish at COSC.

But I guess you also missed the part where I said WGU is something people should still consider while being aware of their culture and asinine policies. Max out near 90 credits I said, and hedge against having to deal with what is a b******t and absolutely predatory policy.

I repeat my objection: that was not an argument, it was a statement of what the policy is.

Personal insults notwithstanding, let's start with one basic concept of reasoning: the burden of proof. Surely you understand that "How is this not predatory?" is a meaningless sentence. Similarly, claiming it is "inherently" predatory does not advance your claim that it is predatory -it merely restates it.

Since you seem to want to play "elementary logic", let's talk logic: your "argument" boils down to this: All policies prohibiting transfer of credit after enrolling are predatory. WGU's policy prohibits transfer of credit after enrolling. Therefore, WGU's policy is predatory. A perfectly valid argument form, but the support for the major premise is severely lacking. Your arguments in favor of that premise seem to be these:

1. The policy is unlike other schools. But a policy being unique does not make it predatory. Additionally, the policy is not unique. Many institutions have the same or similar policy, though it is often worded as saying that the last X credits must be at the school.
2. The policy costs students money. Yes, that's how tuition works.

And let's think about the $ figures here. $1000 is simply not a lot, as tuition goes. It's more than we like to pay here, because we are looking for the cheapest option. But paying $1000 for one class is well below the market rate. It's $333 per credit hour. According to the link below, the average is $595 (though I will note that the average for 4-year public schools is only $325 - right in line with the amount you're claiming is predatory.
Link to all credits earned: Link
[-] The following 2 users Like mysonx3's post:
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#38
This is childish and unproductive. These schools weren't for you, fine. Grow up and move on.
In Progress: MS Cybersecurity, Georgia Tech (9/32cr), 2021?
BS IT Security, Western Governors University, 2018
BA Psychology, Thomas Edison State University, 2016
AA Sociology, Chaffey College, 2015

View all of my earned credits on my Omni Transcript!
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#39
(11-06-2019, 11:39 PM)mysonx3 Wrote:
(11-06-2019, 10:29 PM)ivythrowaway Wrote: The argument was: "No, you could have a single class left and they'd make you shell out a grand for it if you can't make for an extension. They would not let you finish a $25 Saylor Academy credit in this instance."

How is this not predatory? Where in most cases you need to shell out around a grand to finish a degree that few, if any, other universities will accept credit for. This is literally the only institution I know of besides possibly every for-profit school that has a policy. The argument was that the policy is inherently predatory in addition to their dated Boiler Room sales tactics that JoshDosMil also observed.  You make me think TESU should have an elementary logic course available. Just $400 more than a grand would get you an entire term at UMPI or almost half of what it'd cost to finish at COSC.

But I guess you also missed the part where I said WGU is something people should still consider while being aware of their culture and asinine policies. Max out near 90 credits I said, and hedge against having to deal with what is a b******t and absolutely predatory policy.

I repeat my objection: that was not an argument, it was a statement of what the policy is.

Personal insults notwithstanding, let's start with one basic concept of reasoning: the burden of proof. Surely you understand that "How is this not predatory?" is a meaningless sentence. Similarly, claiming it is "inherently" predatory does not advance your claim that it is predatory -it merely restates it.

Since you seem to want to play "elementary logic", let's talk logic: your "argument" boils down to this: All policies prohibiting transfer of credit after enrolling are predatory. WGU's policy prohibits transfer of credit after enrolling. Therefore, WGU's policy is predatory. A perfectly valid argument form, but the support for the major premise is severely lacking. Your arguments in favor of that premise seem to be these:

1. The policy is unlike other schools. But a policy being unique does not make it predatory. Additionally, the policy is not unique. Many institutions have the same or similar policy, though it is often worded as saying that the last X credits must be at the school.
2. The policy costs students money. Yes, that's how tuition works.

And let's think about the $ figures here. $1000 is simply not a lot, as tuition goes. It's more than we like to pay here, because we are looking for the cheapest option. But paying $1000 for one class is well below the market rate. It's $333 per credit hour. According to the link below, the average is $595 (though I will note that the average for 4-year public schools is only $325 - right in line with the amount you're claiming is predatory.

Policies can absolutely be predatory. It's analogous to banks putting a clause in a promissory note prohibiting early repayment on a loan. What WGU is doing is predatory, it's not transparent, it's not polite, and it most certainly doesn't help the student. There's no reason for such a policy other than bilking more tuition dollars out of the student. State a position otherwise or just give it up. If I decided to take a Saylor Academy course that WGU recognizes course equivalency for post-enrollment, I shouldn't transfer it why? You really seem to struggle following this train of thought. 

Other schools certainly do students much worse than this. As my OP stated, I came here for what I suspect is a similar reasons others did. They followed a traditional HS-College pipeline, and they felt the value they received is far less than what they paid. I don't care what the market rate for the average credit hour is, even if what you claim is true. I'd argue the majority of the higher education industry is ridiculously overpriced. Which is supported by the accessibility of financial aid that others on the forum have observed. Most people can't process concepts like compound interest. Hence why student loans are crippling people before they even start in life. College understand this, and hence costs are inflated. 

This article basically touches on the major points I assumed most people are familiar with. So to hear somebody on this forum rationalizing over-priced "market rate" tuition is just comedy on a forum like this. https://www.elizabethton.com/2019/08/19/...-too-high/
Your responses are devoid of any logic, sorry. It's impossible for me not to resort to ad hom because I have no patience for people that lack basic reading comprehension and critical thinking skills.
#40
As a general rule, if one "has" to resort to ad hominem, it's not because their *opponent* lacks reasoning and comprehension skills.

Like jsd said, your behavior is just childish, and I give up trying to reason with you.
Link to all credits earned: Link
[-] The following 1 user Likes mysonx3's post:
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