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Math Help
#21
Well, this gets into proofs and definitions, but first let's cite the extreme value theorem. The extreme value theorem states that if a function is continuous on an interval that is closed, then the function must have or contain a minimum and a maximum on the interval. This can be written as f© <= f(x) <= f(d), where c is the lowest point and d is the highest point on the x-axis and f© and f(d) on the y-axis respectively.

You are stating that it has no minimum or maximum so it has to be a straight line from left to right based on the interval. Therefore all the values are equal and it means that the requirements of that statement, f© <= f(x) <= f(d), is met.

EDIT: So take straight line values that is 1. 1 is less than or equal to 1 which is less than or equal to 1. I think this is what you mean or wanted.

And, why do the Pythagorean theorem?

You do the theorem because you have the x and y values of velocity or in this case speed. You want to find the two dimensional value of that object. This ties into mechanical physics. If an object is moving x with a certain amount of speed (2 ft/s) and y with a certain amount of speed (4 ft/s), then you know it isn't just going in one direction. Not just x or just y; it is moving in both directions at the same time. It's hard to come up with an example since I'm not a professor lol. For every second, it is moving 2 feet along the x-axis (right) and 4 feet along the y-axis (up). Can you see how it isn't moving just one direction at a time? You need to find where it is actually going and the pythagorean theorem helps you calculate that diagonal speed.
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BU:         MS in Software Development (4/32 SH - 1 Course IP) | GPA: 3.70

TESU:       BA in Liberal Studies | AS in Natural Science and Mathematics (Computer Science, Mathematics) | Cert in Electronics |
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TU:         12 SH GPA: 3.91
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CHC:        19 SH
SDCC:       1 SH

CLEP:       Analyzing & Interpreting Literature-60; College Composition Modular-57;
            Information Systems & Computer Applications-53; College Mathematics-50;
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DSST:       Introduction to Computing-423; Principles of Supervision-410;
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Institute:  2 SH
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#22
Oh ya, I remembered a little bit more about physics. You can take each direction to be a vector. In this case, x and y will be i (with that line showing its a vector) and j (with that line showing its a vector) respectively. Then it's 2i + 4j. You want k (with that line showing its a vector). Therefore k = sqrt(i^2 + j^2). I would find videos that demonstrate this, but I'm trying to finish a project for my data structs and algo course. Sorry, this doesn't explain much. I think YouTube videos would benefit you more than my half-ass explanations.
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BU:         MS in Software Development (4/32 SH - 1 Course IP) | GPA: 3.70

TESU:       BA in Liberal Studies | AS in Natural Science and Mathematics (Computer Science, Mathematics) | Cert in Electronics |
            3 SH GPA: 4.00 | Golden Key International Honor Society
EC:         AAS in Technical Studies (Electronic/Instrumentation Technologies) High Honors GPA: 3.79 |
            18 SH GPA: 4.00
CCP:        AAS in Applied Science and Engineering Technology (Graduation DEC2019) Highest Honors GPA: 3.91 | AAS in Technical Studies (Computer Technology) |
            65 SH GPA: 3.91 | Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society

TU:         12 SH GPA: 3.91
CTC:        3 SH GPA: 4.00
CHC:        19 SH
SDCC:       1 SH

CLEP:       Analyzing & Interpreting Literature-60; College Composition Modular-57;
            Information Systems & Computer Applications-53; College Mathematics-50;
            Principles of Marketing-55
DSST:       Introduction to Computing-423; Principles of Supervision-410;
            Introduction to Business-415; Technical Writing-51
Study:      21 SH
Institute:  2 SH
TEEX:       4 SH
Sophia:     2 SH
USN:        88 LL/18 UL (JST ACE Evaluation - ET2)
Certs:      Computer Operator (USMAP) | ICDL_US
Reply
#23
(07-09-2019, 02:40 PM)MrBossmanJr Wrote: Oh ya, I remembered a little bit more about physics. You can take each direction to be a vector. In this case, x and y will be i (with that line showing its a vector) and j (with that line showing its a vector) respectively. Then it's 2i + 4j. You want k (with that line showing its a vector). Therefore k = sqrt(i^2 + j^2). I would find videos that demonstrate this, but I'm trying to finish a project for my data structs and algo course. Sorry, this doesn't explain much. I think YouTube videos would benefit you more than my half-ass explanations.

Thanks for your help
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