Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
My Father's Hands
#1
I've attached a very short story that I read when I was in the fifth grade. It was one of the handful of stories I read as a child that stuck with me my entire life. It's the story of illiteracy told from the perspective of the son of an illiterate farmer. It's still one of the most moving and compelling stories I have ever read.

Maybe the people who read this forum will notice some parallels to the struggles of getting ahead today without a degree. Mostly, it's just a very moving story that I often think about--especially this time of year. I found a reference to this story on a blog which was dated December 23, 2005 (?) so I guess I'm not the only one who thinks of it during the holidays.

Check it out and let me know what you think. Merry Christmas.


Attached Files
.doc   Less than 1 minute ago">My Father's Hands.doc (Size: 41.5 KB / Downloads: 90)
My Excelsior Journey
Bachelor of Science in General Business, cum laude
Excelsior College
Reply
#2
What a sad story! The part that made me feel the most frustration, besides the child-proof cap, was the can of pears. I will remember that part for a while. How sad!
[SIZE="6"]~~ Alissa~~[/SIZE]
[size="4"]"Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right." - - Henry Ford[/size]
[COLOR="DarkSlateGray"][SIZE="2"]DONE:
BS Liberal Studies, Excelsior College May 2009
[/SIZE][/COLOR]
Current website favorite:
http://www.careeronestop.org/
Reply
#3
Reading this story reminds me of how lucky I am to have had a basic education growing up, something that many kids around the world today are still denied. I also connect with the theme that a person's worth can be measured by their heart, rather than their achievements. Thanks for sharing this, and Merry X-mas.
Reply
#4
Thank you for sharing that.
________________________

CLEP
Intro to Psychology 53/50
Intro to Management 59/50
Intro to Sociology 62/50
Humanities 54/50

DSST
Intro to Computing 56/45
World Religions 405/400


FEMA
19

Community College 9 sm hours Gen Elective


[SIZE="5"]CREDITS[/SIZE]
[SIZE="5"]49/120[/SIZE]
Reply
#5
barcotta Wrote:I've attached a very short story that I read when I was in the fifth grade. It was one of the handful of stories I read as a child that stuck with me my entire life. It's the story of illiteracy told from the perspective of the son of an illiterate farmer. It's still one of the most moving and compelling stories I have ever read.

Maybe the people who read this forum will notice some parallels to the struggles of getting ahead today without a degree. Mostly, it's just a very moving story that I often think about--especially this time of year. I found a reference to this story on a blog which was dated December 23, 2005 (?) so I guess I'm not the only one who thinks of it during the holidays.

Check it out and let me know what you think. Merry Christmas.

Michael, this was a very meaningful story. BUT, what I would like to add is that we place SOOOO MUCH value on education (there is nothing wrong w/that) but many people in this world (w/out education) helped create America for what it is today. I use my father, probably many of you can say the same, as an example. Drop-out in the 9th grade, worked w/his hands his whole life and many "educated" people came to rely on him for his expertise. People in the past did not really need an education, their hands spoke for them. He left a great legacy, w/out an education. A Korean War Veteran, lost hearing from mortars, received a combat infantry badge, he did not need a piece of paper to validate himself. I have always maintained that the paper is very valuable to many, especially nowadays since the days of dropping out of school and working w/your hands is not really much of an option anymore. Honestly, when I hear people use the term "educated", I kind of look at that as an insult to many who "are not". I meet many people, pretty much everyday, who do not have degrees, who have sooooo much to offer, and have much more smarts and common sense than the so called "educated". My dad died just over one year ago and many like him lived very productive lives, relied on by those who had degrees but who didn't have the skills the "uneducated" had. This is a pet peeve of mine. I encourage education as much as the next person but realize it's not for everybody, nor does everybody need it. Lastly Michael, don't take this little rant as a personal attack, I have seen many of your posts and you are not only very informative and helpful, your posts no doubt are an inspiration to many on here. This story definitely has special meaning because being that short on skills obviously will create hardships in life, I did get that part of the message. Sorry, I couldn't help myself.
Reply
#6
barcotta Wrote:I've attached a very short story that I read when I was in the fifth grade. It was one of the handful of stories I read as a child that stuck with me my entire life. It's the story of illiteracy told from the perspective of the son of an illiterate farmer. It's still one of the most moving and compelling stories I have ever read.

Maybe the people who read this forum will notice some parallels to the struggles of getting ahead today without a degree. Mostly, it's just a very moving story that I often think about--especially this time of year. I found a reference to this story on a blog which was dated December 23, 2005 (?) so I guess I'm not the only one who thinks of it during the holidays.

Check it out and let me know what you think. Merry Christmas.


I appreciate this story so very much coming from Africa...where in some parts this story is still a reality...I sit here again facing my Destiny in the face and the very thing and reason that burn so strong in my heart the education of many African children....and just how much education can change a person life be it on a Job, personal life or mere enlightment and how education enbles one to dream again and see the light at the end of the tunnel. Even the bible says to those who believe in it "Study to show yourself approved 2 Timothy two vrs 15.
Am also reminded of a chapter I read in the Book "Three Cups" of Tea of a man who was willing to give everthing to have a school built in his village so that future children could be able to read the Koran.
Thank you for sharing
Mapalo
Reply
#7
wow, that story touched me in more than one way.
While,as s'one has pointed out, it may be argued that education need not be given all the importance it may not deserve, the truth is this world has been so altered that for survival,its inhabitants are dependent on basic literacy skills .

I have an aunt back home in an african village who has no children of her own.She also never had an opprtunity to go to school and never learned to read or write. I have never thought much about why she did not attend any school until just now.. Only the 2 women in my dad's family are illiterate, this same aunt and her now late sister. All their brothers had some education(retired as police supritendent, elementary school headteacher, agriculturist and medical doctor respectively).
my grandparents,bless their hearts, though illiterate themselves, embraced the possibilities that an education could do for their boys, and worked hard to give it to them.

Now am begining to think,what about the girls? Obviously in their day,( sometimes in our day too,albeit in more subtle ways..)the gender roles took precedence and this shd have been a factor. They were expected to get married and be taken care of by their future husbands. Their schooling therefore was in the domestic crafts of housewifery only.

For my aunt 2 misfortunes happened; For an undiagnosed reason she was unable to have children,which in her day and setting was a "NO NO" for sustaining a marriage relationship. And so she was to spend the rest of her life without use of the only trade she had been trained for.
secondly, she lived to see her world change to "modernism" following colonialism and then Independence. To 'fit' in to this new 'world' one had better have to be somewhat literate, obviuosly rendering my aunt almost defunct in the 'new' ways.

I will be sending a little money for her this festive season, and i have to find s'body willing and trustworthy to send it to, so they can take it to her. She can't read, write or understand the questions she might be asked if she tried to collect the money herself. When she receives a letter or Xmas card, she needs to find a willing volunteer to read it to her. If its written in English it must be translated to her native language by the volunteer.
Now in her 80s(estimate,birthdate unknown) her health is failing. Shd she go to the hospital, leave alone the difficulty of getting passed the inpatience of frustated overworked,underpaid doctors and nurses, theres the pharmacist to reckon with... they will sing the usual song they do as they hand over the prescribed medication ' take two three times a day ( 1st pill packet passed), one four times a day(2nd packet), drink this 2 teaspoons twice a day blah blah blah. Well she would have understood nothing and will not be able to read the written instructions. God Knows how she wd deal with all those nameless packets of pills...or how the pills wd deal with her...God forbid!!
Your story is not just a 1976 story, its real and its tragic.Mere literacy is a blessing in many parts of the world.
MS
Reply
#8
I know a young man in 7th grade that can not read. I have repeatedly tried to everything that I can think of to get him to work with me so that I can try to work with him on his reading. He wants to do well in school, but given that he can't read that's a virtual impossibility.

I'm not giving up. Stories like that remind me why I shouldn't.

Thanks for sharing.
Smile Cleps:
Introduction Business Law 65
Principles of Management 70
Principles of Marketing 71
A&I Literature 68
American Lit 59
Educational Psychology 68
Social sciences & history 65
Western Civilization I 64


What lies before us and what lies behind us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.
Reply
#9
Namivie Wrote:I know a young man in 7th grade that can not read. I have repeatedly tried to everything that I can think of to get him to work with me so that I can try to work with him on his reading. He wants to do well in school, but given that he can't read that's a virtual impossibility.

I'm not giving up. Stories like that remind me why I shouldn't.

Thanks for sharing.

Namivie...I am so curious how did the young man get to 7th Grade without knowing how to read.....am I thinking its not fair just to let a child go through grades without making sure they get the fundamental of first grade through to 6 of which reading is one of them.

I recommend you for not giving up on this young man....it's a gift of life you are giving him. Please keep up the good work.

Mapalo
Reply
#10
barcotta Wrote:I've attached a very short story that I read when I was in the fifth grade. It was one of the handful of stories I read as a child that stuck with me my entire life. It's the story of illiteracy told from the perspective of the son of an illiterate farmer. It's still one of the most moving and compelling stories I have ever read.

Maybe the people who read this forum will notice some parallels to the struggles of getting ahead today without a degree. Mostly, it's just a very moving story that I often think about--especially this time of year. I found a reference to this story on a blog which was dated December 23, 2005 (?) so I guess I'm not the only one who thinks of it during the holidays.

Check it out and let me know what you think. Merry Christmas.
I think this post should receive two thumbs up thank you again so much for sharing
Mapalo
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Can't Focus: Going Father Down the Rabbit Holes LadySearchDog 7 518 04-19-2020, 09:51 PM
Last Post: dfrecore
  Happy Father's Day 2013 ShotoJuku 0 256 06-16-2013, 08:30 AM
Last Post: ShotoJuku
  Happy Father's Day 2012 ShotoJuku 2 303 06-17-2012, 05:13 PM
Last Post: marianne202
  Happy Father's Day 2011 ShotoJuku 1 383 06-19-2011, 01:13 PM
Last Post: burbuja0512
  Happy Father's Day 2010 ShotoJuku 0 386 06-20-2010, 08:05 AM
Last Post: ShotoJuku
  Dance of 1000 Hands blueberry 3 510 06-24-2009, 03:37 AM
Last Post: ashiq2009
  Happy Father's Day! ShotoJuku 3 431 06-21-2009, 03:52 PM
Last Post: nick94
  Happy Father's Day! ShotoJuku 5 558 06-15-2008, 08:56 PM
Last Post: DetroitSki

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)