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Need help getting another friend started
#11
OMG, your buddy there already has an outstanding Bachelors General Studies, for a cost of application and transfer credits, at $200, it's a steal of a deal! All he needs to do is, put his left foot in, put his right foot in, and shake it all about... put his left hand in, put his left hand out, and yell out Bjcheung77 is the bomb...cuz that's what it's all about!
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#12
(03-11-2021, 12:35 PM)bjcheung77 Wrote: OMG, your buddy there already has an outstanding Bachelors General Studies, for a cost of application and transfer credits, at $200, it's a steal of a deal!  All he needs to do is, put his left foot in, put his right foot in, and shake it all about... put his left hand in, put his left hand out, and yell out Bjcheung77 is the bomb...cuz that's what it's all about!

What school are you talking about?
TESU BSBA/HR 2018 - WVNCC BOG AAS 2017 - GGU Cert in Mgmt 2000
EXAMS: TECEP Tech Wrtg, Comp II, LA Math, PR, Computers  DSST Computers, Pers Fin  CLEP Mgmt, Mktg
COURSES: TESU Capstone  Study.com Pers Fin, Microecon, Stats  Ed4Credit Acct 2  PF Fin Mgmt  ALEKS Int & Coll Alg  Sophia Proj Mgmt The Institutes - Ins Ethics  Kaplan PLA
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#13
Yeah, these could maybe become an Associates Degree in nothing somewhere, but I dont see how 75 credits (some of them barely passed) could become a Bachelors.
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#14
It's really just missing the gen eds to make it a Bachelor's in general/liberal studies. But, again, based on the desire to go teach English abroad, I don't think that's the best option for your friend.
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#15
Teaching English overseas is one of the very few occasions where the type of degree makes zero difference.

Note that the 'lifespan' for teaching English overseas is under 5 years, so basing an entire degree around a few years of TEFLing isn't a great idea. Moreso when it just doesn't matter.

Pathway for teaching English: Get an undergrad degree in whatever (underwater basket weaving, business administration, etc). If you're off to Asia, you'll then need a TEFL certificate from any random outfit (groupon is actually useful here). Europe, get a CELTA and don't waste your time on anything else. Middle East: skip, unless you're willing to get a Master's as well (here, postgrad degree type will actually matter: English, Linguistics, or Education).

If you want to teach in International schools around the world, you'll need to be a certified teacher in your home country and have at least two years of experience first. Be prepared to work in some isolated outpost when you first go overseas.

If you just want to teach overseas for a bit, and you can get a general studies bachelor quickly and cheaply, doing that and using the leftover cash for a CELTA is a far better idea than spending heaps of time and money on an English degree. An English degree is about understanding English literature: teaching English is completely divorced from that. For teaching English to non-native speakers, you'll get more utility out of 4 weeks of the CELTA than you will 6 months of Shakespeare and Jane Austen.
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#16
(03-12-2021, 04:41 PM)innen_oda Wrote: Teaching English overseas is one of the very few occasions where the type of degree makes zero difference.

Note that the 'lifespan' for teaching English overseas is under 5 years, so basing an entire degree around a few years of TEFLing isn't a great idea. Moreso when it just doesn't matter.

Pathway for teaching English: Get an undergrad degree in whatever (underwater basket weaving, business administration, etc). If you're off to Asia, you'll then need a TEFL certificate from any random outfit (groupon is actually useful here). Europe, get a CELTA and don't waste your time on anything else. Middle East: skip, unless you're willing to get a Master's as well (here, postgrad degree type will actually matter: English, Linguistics, or Education).

If you want to teach in International schools around the world, you'll need to be a certified teacher in your home country and have at least two years of experience first. Be prepared to work in some isolated outpost when you first go overseas.

If you just want to teach overseas for a bit, and you can get a general studies bachelor quickly and cheaply, doing that and using the leftover cash for a CELTA is a far better idea than spending heaps of time and money on an English degree. An English degree is about understanding English literature: teaching English is completely divorced from that. For teaching English to non-native speakers, you'll get more utility out of 4 weeks of the CELTA than you will 6 months of Shakespeare and Jane Austen.

Thank you for pointing that out.  I can never figure out why anyone would think that an English degree (which basically involves reading a lot of literature) would be at all useful teaching English to someone who doesn't speak English in some other country.  They're not at all the same thing.  And when people come here and take courses on how to speak English, the classes many times are taught at a public library or community center by people who are not only NOT English teacher's, they not usually teachers of any kind, and aren't required to have a degree or certified in anything.  They just have to care and have a passion for helping people learn English.
TESU BSBA/HR 2018 - WVNCC BOG AAS 2017 - GGU Cert in Mgmt 2000
EXAMS: TECEP Tech Wrtg, Comp II, LA Math, PR, Computers  DSST Computers, Pers Fin  CLEP Mgmt, Mktg
COURSES: TESU Capstone  Study.com Pers Fin, Microecon, Stats  Ed4Credit Acct 2  PF Fin Mgmt  ALEKS Int & Coll Alg  Sophia Proj Mgmt The Institutes - Ins Ethics  Kaplan PLA
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#17
(03-12-2021, 04:51 PM)dfrecore Wrote: And when people come here and take courses on how to speak English, the classes many times are taught at a public library or community center by people who are not only NOT English teacher's, they not usually teachers of any kind, and aren't required to have a degree or certified in anything.  They just have to care and have a passion for helping people learn English.

Exactly. The only reason a person needs a bachelor degree at all to teach English in Asia is due to national visa law for foreigners - if the hiring school could legally employ a high school grad (and work them more for less pay), they absolutely would.
To be perfectly frank, your appearance will make a much bigger difference in Asia than your qualifications. The more Anglo you look, the happier parents will be (which in turn makes your hiring school happy). No one there cares what you studied.
You genuinely have to either really enjoy teaching kids, or have excellent compartmentalisation skills (or both) to survive with your mental health in check.

In Europe and the Middle East, it's a little bit different, but a lit. degree won't be the deciding factor there.

If anything, in Europe and some positions in the Middle East, a business degree may be more helpful on a personal level, because you'll probably be teaching English to business men and women, so having an appreciation for those business concepts may make connecting with your students easier (having your students like you WILL make the difference in your contract being renewed or not).

For what it's worth: Native English speakers have a dreadful time grading their language for non-natives speakers. Most new TEFL teachers are abominable teachers for this reason. I would worry that taking an entire undergrad in English would make an already significant problem, even bigger.

Google 'example lesson plan ical tefl' for a good example of what a TEFL/TESOL teacher does day in and day out. Literally everyone (well, almost everyone) on this board knows sufficient English to teach this stuff. The skill is in knowing how to teach.
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#18
(03-12-2021, 05:26 PM)innen_oda Wrote:
(03-12-2021, 04:51 PM)dfrecore Wrote: And when people come here and take courses on how to speak English, the classes many times are taught at a public library or community center by people who are not only NOT English teacher's, they not usually teachers of any kind, and aren't required to have a degree or certified in anything.  They just have to care and have a passion for helping people learn English.

Exactly. The only reason a person needs a bachelor degree at all to teach English in Asia is due to national visa law for foreigners - if the hiring school could legally employ a high school grad (and work them more for less pay), they absolutely would.
To be perfectly frank, your appearance will make a much bigger difference in Asia than your qualifications. The more Anglo you look, the happier parents will be (which in turn makes your hiring school happy). No one there cares what you studied.
You genuinely have to either really enjoy teaching kids, or have excellent compartmentalisation skills (or both) to survive with your mental health in check.

In Europe and the Middle East, it's a little bit different, but a lit. degree won't be the deciding factor there.

If anything, in Europe and some positions in the Middle East, a business degree may be more helpful on a personal level, because you'll probably be teaching English to business men and women, so having an appreciation for those business concepts may make connecting with your students easier (having your students like you WILL make the difference in your contract being renewed or not).

For what it's worth: Native English speakers have a dreadful time grading their language for non-natives speakers. Most new TEFL teachers are abominable teachers for this reason. I would worry that taking an entire undergrad in English would make an already significant problem, even bigger.

Google 'example lesson plan ical tefl' for a good example of what a TEFL/TESOL teacher does day in and day out. Literally everyone (well, almost everyone) on this board knows sufficient English to teach this stuff. The skill is in knowing how to teach.

The lesson plan looks like what my kids Spanish 1 textbooks look like.  Teaching Spanish to high school students from the beginning.  Simple for those to teach if they know Spanish, but what actually makes the difference is how good they are at teaching.
TESU BSBA/HR 2018 - WVNCC BOG AAS 2017 - GGU Cert in Mgmt 2000
EXAMS: TECEP Tech Wrtg, Comp II, LA Math, PR, Computers  DSST Computers, Pers Fin  CLEP Mgmt, Mktg
COURSES: TESU Capstone  Study.com Pers Fin, Microecon, Stats  Ed4Credit Acct 2  PF Fin Mgmt  ALEKS Int & Coll Alg  Sophia Proj Mgmt The Institutes - Ins Ethics  Kaplan PLA
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#19
The degree I am referring to is the 3 year RA Bachelors of General Studies at Athabasca University in Canada, it is a 90 college credit offering that can be completed by transfer credit (entirely through 100% transfer) at the cost of $200 application/evaluation fee. The degree requirements can be met through community college 1st/2nd year courses, you do not need to get courses through a 4 year college/university.

Their course number will be confusing for many as the majority of their intro courses start at the 200 level as 100 is preparatory. For those who have a couple of developmental/remedial courses, they will allow up to 6 credits at the 100 level (which is developmental, prep, remedial), 200 is first year, 300 is 2nd year, 400 is 3rd year. You can use a mix of credits from the diploma & from your 2 years at university to "finish" this degree.

Last but not least, if your friend wants to "get a 4 year degree" you can just ladder this into say a Big 3 or competency based degree provider such as Walden, UMPI or whatever and finish the final year at that school of choice in a concentration or major of your choice as well. This would be the stepping stone to a Masters, you can go for a competency based masters degree as the final frontier!
In Progress: Walden MBA | TESU BA Biology & Computer Science
The Basic Approach | Plans | DegreeForum Community Supported Wiki
~Note~ Read/Review forum posts & Wiki Links to Sample Degree Plans

TESU ASNSM Biology, BSBA (ACBSP Accredited in 2017)
Universidad Isabel I: ENEB MBA, Big Data & BI, Digital Marketing & E-Commerce
Business & IT Certs: 6Sigma/Lean/Scrum, ITIL | Cisco, CompTIA, MTA | Coursera & Udacity
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#20
(03-12-2021, 04:51 PM)dfrecore Wrote: Thank you for pointing that out.  I can never figure out why anyone would think that an English degree (which basically involves reading a lot of literature) would be at all useful teaching English to someone who doesn't speak English in some other country.  They're not at all the same thing.  And when people come here and take courses on how to speak English, the classes many times are taught at a public library or community center by people who are not only NOT English teacher's, they not usually teachers of any kind, and aren't required to have a degree or certified in anything.  They just have to care and have a passion for helping people learn English.

I know it doesn't have to be English, which is why I also suggested History. A specific concentration is going to be way more useful to a later career than a general check-the-box degree, especially if the friend doesn't have any plans for what he's going to do after he's done teaching English. I know Liberal/General Studies is popular here because it's "quick" but, with how quick and easy UMPI specialized degrees are, there is NO reason to limit yourself with a generalized non-specific degree. 

Yeah, sure, you can go back and get a Master's degree later, but why trust that you're going to have the time/money to do that in the future? Get the best degree you can right now and don't put off until tomorrow what you can do today.
In progress:
Pierpont - AAS BOG
TESU - BA Computer Science; BSBA CIS; ASNSM Math & CS; ASBA


Completed:
Sophia (30 courses), The Institutes (old), Study.com (5 courses)
ASU: Human Origins, Astronomy, Intro Health & Wellness, Western Civilization, Computer Appls & Info Technology, Intro Programming
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