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Pink Collar Job Growth is Outpacing Blue Collar Job Growth
#1
There are far more pink collar jobs than blue collar jobs, but many men are declining to take pink collar jobs because it's "women's work." Pink collar jobs are less likely to be off-shored or replaced with automation because they're based on human interaction.
https://www.axios.com/young-men-educatio...c4dc0.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/20...72c06b6639
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#2
(02-27-2019, 07:53 AM)sanantone Wrote: There are far more pink collar jobs than blue collar jobs, but many men are declining to take pink collar jobs because it's "women's work." Pink collar jobs are less likely to be off-shored or replaced with automation because they're based on human interaction.
https://www.axios.com/young-men-educatio...c4dc0.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/20...72c06b6639

They use a lot of jargon, but don't explain any of it.  What exactly are pink-collar jobs?  I mean, a list of more than 2-3 would be nice.

So in looking it up, I agree that my son is not going to do a single one of the jobs listed.  I will note that most are low-paying, and wouldn't support a family, something he would take into account when choosing a career (he's looking at majoring in Mechanical Engineering in college).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink-collar_worker
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#3
(02-27-2019, 10:41 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 07:53 AM)sanantone Wrote: There are far more pink collar jobs than blue collar jobs, but many men are declining to take pink collar jobs because it's "women's work." Pink collar jobs are less likely to be off-shored or replaced with automation because they're based on human interaction.
https://www.axios.com/young-men-educatio...c4dc0.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/20...72c06b6639

They use a lot of jargon, but don't explain any of it.  What exactly are pink-collar jobs?  I mean, a list of more than 2-3 would be nice.

So in looking it up, I agree that my son is not going to do a single one of the jobs listed.  I will note that most are low-paying, and wouldn't support a family, something he would take into account when choosing a career (he's looking at majoring in Mechanical Engineering in college).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink-collar_worker

Engineering is a white collar job. People who are going to college for white collar jobs typically aren't considering low-paying pink collar or blue collar jobs. The article is mainly talking about blue collar men who are struggling to find work as their jobs are taken over by robots.
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#4
(02-27-2019, 10:41 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 07:53 AM)sanantone Wrote: There are far more pink collar jobs than blue collar jobs, but many men are declining to take pink collar jobs because it's "women's work." Pink collar jobs are less likely to be off-shored or replaced with automation because they're based on human interaction.
https://www.axios.com/young-men-educatio...c4dc0.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/20...72c06b6639

They use a lot of jargon, but don't explain any of it.  What exactly are pink-collar jobs?  I mean, a list of more than 2-3 would be nice.

So in looking it up, I agree that my son is not going to do a single one of the jobs listed.  I will note that most are low-paying, and wouldn't support a family, something he would take into account when choosing a career (he's looking at majoring in Mechanical Engineering in college).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink-collar_worker

This is only the second or third time I've heard the expression, but I understand it to mean "girl" jobs that are labor/hands on as opposed to administrative or c-level. Caregiver roles would be an example - but that's not to say they are unskilled jobs, in the way that a welder would be skilled, and a nurse would be as well.
I think they're just trying to stir the pot lol.
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#5
(02-27-2019, 01:35 PM)cookderosa Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 10:41 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 07:53 AM)sanantone Wrote: There are far more pink collar jobs than blue collar jobs, but many men are declining to take pink collar jobs because it's "women's work." Pink collar jobs are less likely to be off-shored or replaced with automation because they're based on human interaction.
https://www.axios.com/young-men-educatio...c4dc0.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/20...72c06b6639

They use a lot of jargon, but don't explain any of it.  What exactly are pink-collar jobs?  I mean, a list of more than 2-3 would be nice.

So in looking it up, I agree that my son is not going to do a single one of the jobs listed.  I will note that most are low-paying, and wouldn't support a family, something he would take into account when choosing a career (he's looking at majoring in Mechanical Engineering in college).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink-collar_worker

This is only the second or third time I've heard the expression, but I understand it to mean "girl" jobs that are labor/hands on as opposed to administrative or c-level. Caregiver roles would be an example - but that's not to say they are unskilled jobs, in the way that a welder would be skilled, and a nurse would be as well.
I think they're just trying to stir the pot lol.
Administrative roles are definitely part of the "pink collar" category. Along with nurse, secretary is one of the two occupations that first come to mind when I think of a "pink collar" job.
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#6
There are some decent-paying jobs on the list that require two years or less of schooling i.e. paralegal and dental hygienist. Nursing is increasingly requiring a BSN, but there is a small increase of men entering this field. I don't know why someone would choose to struggle instead of doing a "woman's" job. When women were rarely allowed to have a job, men were in these types of occupations. Only when women started to dominate these positions did pay go down and people started looking down upon the work.

Dental hygienists spend half the time in school and make only $10k less than mechanical engineers. Dental hygienists make tens of thousands more than the trades people always talk about. When you consider how long it takes to become a journeyman, becoming a dental hygienist is a lot faster.
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#7
(02-27-2019, 02:09 PM)sanantone Wrote: There are some decent-paying jobs on the list that require two years or less of schooling i.e. paralegal and dental hygienist. Nursing is increasingly requiring a BSN, but there is a small increase of men entering this field. I don't know why someone would choose to struggle instead of doing a "woman's" job. When women were rarely allowed to have a job, men were in these types of occupations. Only when women started to dominate these positions did pay go down and people started looking down upon the work.

Dental hygienists spend half the time in school and make only $10k less than mechanical engineers. Dental hygienists make tens of thousands more than the trades people always talk about. When you consider how long it takes to become a journeyman, becoming a dental hygienist is a lot faster.

My grandmother became a dental hygienist in her 40s, and while it has been extremely demanding work, it enabled her to provide not only for herself and her immediate family, but also for my family as I was growing up. It paid well, and her work ethic pushed her to the very top of her profession (she served as the chair of the dental hygiene board at one point). Her program was a weird one though, in that she had to take two years of pre-requisites in order to get into the two year RDH program.
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#8
(02-27-2019, 02:19 PM)mysonx3 Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 02:09 PM)sanantone Wrote: There are some decent-paying jobs on the list that require two years or less of schooling i.e. paralegal and dental hygienist. Nursing is increasingly requiring a BSN, but there is a small increase of men entering this field. I don't know why someone would choose to struggle instead of doing a "woman's" job. When women were rarely allowed to have a job, men were in these types of occupations. Only when women started to dominate these positions did pay go down and people started looking down upon the work.

Dental hygienists spend half the time in school and make only $10k less than mechanical engineers. Dental hygienists make tens of thousands more than the trades people always talk about. When you consider how long it takes to become a journeyman, becoming a dental hygienist is a lot faster.

My grandmother became a dental hygienist in her 40s, and while it has been extremely demanding work, it enabled her to provide not only for herself and her immediate family, but also for my family as I was growing up. It paid well, and her work ethic pushed her to the very top of her profession (she served as the chair of the dental hygiene board at one point). Her program was a weird one though, in that she had to take two years of pre-requisites in order to get into the two year RDH program.

I know someone who is studying dental hygiene at a for-profit school, and he didn't have to worry about prerequisites. LOL
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#9
(02-27-2019, 11:10 AM)sanantone Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 10:41 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 07:53 AM)sanantone Wrote: There are far more pink collar jobs than blue collar jobs, but many men are declining to take pink collar jobs because it's "women's work." Pink collar jobs are less likely to be off-shored or replaced with automation because they're based on human interaction.
https://www.axios.com/young-men-educatio...c4dc0.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/20...72c06b6639

They use a lot of jargon, but don't explain any of it.  What exactly are pink-collar jobs?  I mean, a list of more than 2-3 would be nice.

So in looking it up, I agree that my son is not going to do a single one of the jobs listed.  I will note that most are low-paying, and wouldn't support a family, something he would take into account when choosing a career (he's looking at majoring in Mechanical Engineering in college).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink-collar_worker

Engineering is a white collar job. People who are going to college for white collar jobs typically aren't considering low-paying pink collar or blue collar jobs. The article is mainly talking about blue collar men who are struggling to find work as their jobs are taken over by robots.

I wasn't saying that my kid is comparing mechanical engineering to this. I was saying that he's looking at a career that can support a family, and these aren't going to cut it.

Here where we live, the trades pay VERY well.  If you're a roofer or a welder or HVAC person, you are making good money.  And, I know a lot of guys (and not many girls) who consider being in the elements (outside, or in a 120 degree attic) just fine as a part of the job.  My kid is totally cool with working outside or doing manual/physical labor if he ended up not going to college.

Some of these jobs are kind of weirdly on here because they do require quite a lot of schooling.  I don't think you can be a librarian most places without a masters degree.  Nutritionist? HR Manager?  Those are going to require a degree/certification of some kind.

Let's not even talk about things where you have to have talent in that area (interior designer, stylist, actor, dancer).  Those are just silly.

And yes, dental hygienist is a good deal (ROI for amount of time spent in school vs. salary), as are a few other jobs on the list.  But in general, these are low-paying menial jobs, and I can understand why men don't want to do them (you have to take care of someone AND get paid crappy wages - thanks but no thanks).
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#10
(02-28-2019, 03:06 PM)dfrecore Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 11:10 AM)sanantone Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 10:41 AM)dfrecore Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 07:53 AM)sanantone Wrote: There are far more pink collar jobs than blue collar jobs, but many men are declining to take pink collar jobs because it's "women's work." Pink collar jobs are less likely to be off-shored or replaced with automation because they're based on human interaction.
https://www.axios.com/young-men-educatio...c4dc0.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/20...72c06b6639

They use a lot of jargon, but don't explain any of it.  What exactly are pink-collar jobs?  I mean, a list of more than 2-3 would be nice.

So in looking it up, I agree that my son is not going to do a single one of the jobs listed.  I will note that most are low-paying, and wouldn't support a family, something he would take into account when choosing a career (he's looking at majoring in Mechanical Engineering in college).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink-collar_worker

Engineering is a white collar job. People who are going to college for white collar jobs typically aren't considering low-paying pink collar or blue collar jobs. The article is mainly talking about blue collar men who are struggling to find work as their jobs are taken over by robots.

I wasn't saying that my kid is comparing mechanical engineering to this. I was saying that he's looking at a career that can support a family, and these aren't going to cut it.

Here where we live, the trades pay VERY well.  If you're a roofer or a welder or HVAC person, you are making good money.  And, I know a lot of guys (and not many girls) who consider being in the elements (outside, or in a 120 degree attic) just fine as a part of the job.  My kid is totally cool with working outside or doing manual/physical labor if he ended up not going to college.

Some of these jobs are kind of weirdly on here because they do require quite a lot of schooling.  I don't think you can be a librarian most places without a masters degree.  Nutritionist? HR Manager?  Those are going to require a degree/certification of some kind.

Let's not even talk about things where you have to have talent in that area (interior designer, stylist, actor, dancer).  Those are just silly.

And yes, dental hygienist is a good deal (ROI for amount of time spent in school vs. salary), as are a few other jobs on the list.  But in general, these are low-paying menial jobs, and I can understand why men don't want to do them (you have to take care of someone AND get paid crappy wages - thanks but no thanks).

The article is explaining why so many men are choosing to stay unemployed or stay with unstable employment. One of the reasons is that so many men either don't have families, or they don't feel obligated to take care of their children. 

If I'm unemployed, I'll take anything.
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