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Professional Doctorate - No Dissertation or Research Project
#1
If you're interested in health science and just need a doctorate to teach clinical courses, then Eastern Virginia Medical School has a Doctor of Health Science that does not require a dissertation or research project. Even though the program is only 42 credits, they only allow students to take two courses each fall and spring and one course in the summer making the program three years long. 

Tuition is $919 per credit hour. All coursework is online. You need a master's degree related to health science, education, or management. 

https://www.evms.edu/education/doctoral_..._sciences/
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#2
(01-15-2019, 11:31 AM)sanantone Wrote: If you're interested in health science and just need a doctorate to teach clinical courses, then Eastern Virginia Medical School has a Doctor of Health Science that does not require a dissertation or research project. Even though the program is only 42 credits, they only allow students to take two courses each fall and spring and one course in the summer making the program three years long. 

Tuition is $919 per credit hour. All coursework is online. You need a master's degree related to health science, education, or management. 

https://www.evms.edu/education/doctoral_..._sciences/

Nice. Though the advantage of a professional doctorate is usually speed. It seems like that one will end up taking about as long as a traditional doctorate. Maybe a bit less depending on how quickly the dissertation can be completed and defended.

Now if I could find something comparable for leadership/management/business or CS. I found UoP's DBA and DM programs which are professional degrees without dissertations, both at 62 credits @ $810 per credit, and its UoP, so not the greatest reputation. But I haven't found any other options, particularly for online-friendly RA schools. My goal would be to finish in two years or less if possible. Too bad there aren't competency-based doctorate programs. Apparently, Fielding was working on one, but I don't know what happened to it.
In Progress: MBA in IT Management, Western Governors University (25/35cu | Sep 2019)
Up Next: Perhaps an MSCS or a DBA/DM/Ph.D.

Complete:
BSBA in Computer Information Systems, 2019, Thomas Edison State University
ASNSM in Computer Science, 2019, Thomas Edison State University

B&M CC: 8.68cr, TESU: 3cr, CLEP/DSST: 15cr, Study.com: 57cr, Straighterline: 19cr, ALEKS: 9cr, TEEX: 6cr, The Institutes: 2cr, Sophia: 2cr
(121.68 credits total. 95 credits earned in 10 months, with 45 of those earned in ~3 months)
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#3
Most doctoral programs take more than four years. I believe the average length is over eight years now. Even if you knock off two years for having a master's degree, that's still six years. The fastest doctorate I've seen is ASU's DBH. It's 18 months. A lot of online programs are designed to take 3-4 years, but a lot of people have complained about for-profit schools slowing down the dissertation phase.

I checked UoP's website, and the DBA and DM require a dissertation. If I had to guess, I would say that 99% of the online professional doctorates require a dissertation, applied research project, or a capstone that takes almost as long as a dissertation.
PhD (in progress)
Masters and Graduate Certificate
AAS, AS, BA, and BS
CLEP
Intro Psych 70, US His I 64, Intro Soc 63, Intro Edu Psych 70, A&I Lit 64, Bio 68, Prin Man 69, Prin Mar 68
DSST
Life Dev Psych 62, Fund Coun 68, Intro Comp 469, Intro Astr 56, Env & Hum 70, HTYH 456, MIS 451, Prin Sup 453, HRM 62, Bus Eth 458
ALEKS
Int Alg, Coll Alg
TEEX
4 credits
TECEP
Fed Inc Tax, Sci of Nutr, Micro, Strat Man, Med Term, Pub Relations
CSU
Sys Analysis & Design, Programming, Cyber
SL
Intro to Comm, Microbio, Acc I
Uexcel
A&P
Davar
Macro, Intro to Fin, Man Acc
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#4
(01-15-2019, 06:03 PM)sanantone Wrote: Most doctoral programs take more than four years. I believe the average length is over eight years now. Even if you knock off two years for having a master's degree, that's still six years. The fastest doctorate I've seen is ASU's DBH. It's 18 months.

I checked UoP's website, and the DBA and DM require a dissertation. If I had to guess, I would say that 99% of the online professional doctorates require a dissertation, applied project, or a capstone that takes almost as long as a dissertation.
From what I've seen most doctorate programs expect a 4-8 year investment, though professional doctorates are supposed to take less than 4. I haven't heard about ASU's DBH, not that it applies to me, but 18 months super-quick.

As for UoP, you're right. I just went back to look and I see a dissertation listed now. I must have missed it when I originally looked a couple months back. I could have sworn those weren't there though. In fact, I'm pretty sure I found them as a referral for professional doctorates without dissertation requirements. That means I can pull UoP off the list completely though. The only reason they were on my list at all was because I thought those degrees lacked the dissertation requirement.

While I am still doing my research, I was under the impression that most professional doctorates did not have a dissertation requirement. I've seen articles discussing professional degrees in business (like DBA, DM, and DL) that don't have a dissertation requirement, but I haven't actually found any yet. Perhaps they're only at B&M schools. Then again, if they have a project or capstone that takes more than a year to complete then it might as well be the same thing. The point is to find a quicker path to the degree (at least for me, given I'd be retirement age before I could complete a traditional Ph.D.). The sooner I can earn the degree, the sooner I can put it to use.

I may end up forgetting about the PhD if I can't find an accelerated path. Maybe I'll just focus on a second masters and call it good. Smile
In Progress: MBA in IT Management, Western Governors University (25/35cu | Sep 2019)
Up Next: Perhaps an MSCS or a DBA/DM/Ph.D.

Complete:
BSBA in Computer Information Systems, 2019, Thomas Edison State University
ASNSM in Computer Science, 2019, Thomas Edison State University

B&M CC: 8.68cr, TESU: 3cr, CLEP/DSST: 15cr, Study.com: 57cr, Straighterline: 19cr, ALEKS: 9cr, TEEX: 6cr, The Institutes: 2cr, Sophia: 2cr
(121.68 credits total. 95 credits earned in 10 months, with 45 of those earned in ~3 months)
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#5
(01-15-2019, 06:22 PM)Merlin Wrote:
(01-15-2019, 06:03 PM)sanantone Wrote: Most doctoral programs take more than four years. I believe the average length is over eight years now. Even if you knock off two years for having a master's degree, that's still six years. The fastest doctorate I've seen is ASU's DBH. It's 18 months.

I checked UoP's website, and the DBA and DM require a dissertation. If I had to guess, I would say that 99% of the online professional doctorates require a dissertation, applied project, or a capstone that takes almost as long as a dissertation.
From what I've seen most doctorate programs expect a 4-8 year investment, though professional doctorates are supposed to take less than 4. I haven't heard about ASU's DBH, not that it applies to me, but 18 months super-quick.

As for UoP, you're right. I just went back to look and I see a dissertation listed now. I must have missed it when I originally looked a couple months back. I could have sworn those weren't there though. In fact, I'm pretty sure I found them as a referral for professional doctorates without dissertation requirements. That means I can pull UoP off the list completely though. The only reason they were on my list at all was because I thought those degrees lacked the dissertation requirement.

While I am still doing my research, I was under the impression that most professional doctorates did not have a dissertation requirement. I've seen articles discussing professional degrees in business (like DBA, DM, and DL) that don't have a dissertation requirement, but I haven't actually found any yet. Perhaps they're only at B&M schools. Then again, if they have a project or capstone that takes more than a year to complete then it might as well be the same thing. The point is to find a quicker path to the degree (at least for me, given I'd be retirement age before I could complete a traditional Ph.D.). The sooner I can earn the degree, the sooner I can put it to use.

I may end up forgetting about the PhD if I can't find an accelerated path. Maybe I'll just focus on a second masters and call it good. Smile

I used to see articles that said that the difference between a PhD in psychology and a PsyD is that the PsyD doesn't have a dissertation, but I haven't found this to be true. Recently, I saw a website that said that PsyD programs typically have a dissertation, which is in line from what I've seen. The same is true for EdDs. Some websites inaccurately claimed that EdD programs typically don't have a dissertation, but they typically do. 

Excluding online doctoral programs for occupational therapists, physical therapists, pharmacists etc. who are looking to upgrade to a doctorate, I've only found a few of doctoral programs that don't require a dissertation or equivalent. There's this program, and there are two degrees at University of Western States. The EdD in Sports Psychology and the EdD in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at University of Western States let students opt for a year-long practicum instead of a dissertation. I'm assuming that the applied project in ASU's DBH program isn't that involved if they expect full-time students to finish in 18 months, but the program is expensive.
PhD (in progress)
Masters and Graduate Certificate
AAS, AS, BA, and BS
CLEP
Intro Psych 70, US His I 64, Intro Soc 63, Intro Edu Psych 70, A&I Lit 64, Bio 68, Prin Man 69, Prin Mar 68
DSST
Life Dev Psych 62, Fund Coun 68, Intro Comp 469, Intro Astr 56, Env & Hum 70, HTYH 456, MIS 451, Prin Sup 453, HRM 62, Bus Eth 458
ALEKS
Int Alg, Coll Alg
TEEX
4 credits
TECEP
Fed Inc Tax, Sci of Nutr, Micro, Strat Man, Med Term, Pub Relations
CSU
Sys Analysis & Design, Programming, Cyber
SL
Intro to Comm, Microbio, Acc I
Uexcel
A&P
Davar
Macro, Intro to Fin, Man Acc
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#6
(01-15-2019, 11:31 AM)sanantone Wrote: If you're interested in health science and just need a doctorate to teach clinical courses, then Eastern Virginia Medical School has a Doctor of Health Science that does not require a dissertation or research project. Even though the program is only 42 credits, they only allow students to take two courses each fall and spring and one course in the summer making the program three years long. 

Tuition is $919 per credit hour. All coursework is online. You need a master's degree related to health science, education, or management. 

https://www.evms.edu/education/doctoral_..._sciences/

That looks awesome! If I returned to industry as a foodservice director, I could 100% see myself in the healthcare segment and chasing down a degree like that.
Jennifer
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MS Applied Nutrition, 2014 Canisius College, NY
Premed/Prenursing Sciences, 2011 Ocean County College, NJ
BA Social Science, 2008 Thomas Edison State University, NJ
AA General Studies, 2008 Thomas Edison State University, NJ
AOS Culinary Arts,1990 Culinary Institute of America, NY

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#7
Traditionally, professional doctorates and scholarly doctorates differ primarily on the basis of the thesis. Scholarly doctorates typically require original and significant contribution to theory. This is typically done by either building or testing theory, fills a new niche in the field, and builds on the work of others.

Professional doctorates typically do not require original, significant contributions to scholarship. Instead, they tend to require significant contributions to practice instead of scholarship.

Typically, the PhD is a scholarly doctorate while other, alternative titles (EdD, DBA, etc.) are professional. However these lines are sometimes blurred, with such degrees still requiring an original and significant contribution to scholarship.

Blurring things further are doctorates that do not require a thesis/dissertation at all. Some require a comparable (or, at least, substantive) project, but others without the requirement are emerging.

Finally, there are first professional doctorates. These are not really doctoral degree programs, despite their titles. They are entry-level credentials for certain professions that, typically (there's that word again) call their practitioners "doctor." The MD, OD, DO, DC, DDS, and (recently emerging) the DNP are examples.

While we're at it, let's clear something up about the title "doctor." Yes, academics who have completed a doctorate are fully entitled to the use of the title. In fact, scholarly doctorates pre-date professional doctorates by hundreds of years and is based in scholarship, designating an advanced scholar (and often faculty member) of a university. Applying the title "doctor" to physicians, dentists, and the like stems from their profession; the degrees came later.

Is it appropriate to refer to one's self as "doctor"? For both medical professionals and academics, IMHO, only when it's relevant in a professional setting. Even then, it's not really necessary most of the time.

Is it appropriate to refer to someone else as "doctor"? Sure. It goes for both medical professionals and academics. But it's not important and it would be really rude to correct someone unnecessarily.
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#8
(01-29-2019, 07:57 PM)Sagan Wrote: Traditionally, professional doctorates and scholarly doctorates differ primarily on the basis of the thesis. Scholarly doctorates typically require original and significant contribution to theory. This is typically done by either building or testing theory, fills a new niche in the field, and builds on the work of others.

Professional doctorates typically do not require original, significant contributions to scholarship. Instead, they tend to require significant contributions to practice instead of scholarship.

Typically, the PhD is a scholarly doctorate while other, alternative titles (EdD, DBA, etc.) are professional. However these lines are sometimes blurred, with such degrees still requiring an original and significant contribution to scholarship.

Blurring things further are doctorates that do not require a thesis/dissertation at all. Some require a comparable (or, at least, substantive) project, but others without the requirement are emerging.

Finally, there are first professional doctorates. These are not really doctoral degree programs, despite their titles. They are entry-level credentials for certain professions that, typically (there's that word again) call their practitioners "doctor." The MD, OD, DO, DC, DDS, and (recently emerging) the DNP are examples.

While we're at it, let's clear something up about the title "doctor." Yes, academics who have completed a doctorate are fully entitled to the use of the title. In fact, scholarly doctorates pre-date professional doctorates by hundreds of years and is based in scholarship, designating an advanced scholar (and often faculty member) of a university. Applying the title "doctor" to physicians, dentists, and the like stems from their profession; the degrees came later.

Is it appropriate to refer to one's self as "doctor"? For both medical professionals and academics, IMHO, only when it's relevant in a professional setting. Even then, it's not really necessary most of the time.

Is it appropriate to refer to someone else as "doctor"? Sure. It goes for both medical professionals and academics. But it's not important and it would be really rude to correct someone unnecessarily.


The disruption of education (thank you, technology) will change the niceties and etiquette that have previously dictated the understanding of what a doctorate is / is not. No question in my mind we'll see expansion and morphing of the degree- academic research or professional.
Since fewer schools are accredited to award doctors, it will take longer, but it's coming.......
Jennifer
10-year member

MS Applied Nutrition, 2014 Canisius College, NY
Premed/Prenursing Sciences, 2011 Ocean County College, NJ
BA Social Science, 2008 Thomas Edison State University, NJ
AA General Studies, 2008 Thomas Edison State University, NJ
AOS Culinary Arts,1990 Culinary Institute of America, NY

Homeschooling for College Credit
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