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The official guide to self-study RA courses from ASU, BYU, UIdaho, etc.
#31
Provider: ASU Universal Learner Courses
Course: ECN 211: Macroeconomic Principles
Course content: Far more effort was put into creating this course than any other ASU ULC/EA course I have taken. Whereas many of the courses just throw lecture videos and PDF readings at you, ASU developed their own custom interactive journey through economics for this course. You'll follow an animated character as he encounters different economics concepts. Most of the course content is in those ungraded interactive pages. There are a few short lecture videos, but they play a minor role. Homework practice questions follow the learning objects. These allow unlimited attempts but are still a part of the grade. Then there are quizzes for each unit and two exams. Each exam covers about half of the course. Discussions and live sessions are optional but helpful.
Final exam format: 50 questions. Mostly multiple choice, but some more challenging selection and number types.
Final exam content vs course content/practice exams: The proctored final covered the last half of the course, and was addressed very well by the course materials. There is also an extensive and helpful optional review section at the end of the course before the exam.
Time taken on course: About 7-10 hours/week for 7.5 weeks
Familiarity with subject before course: I took the Sophia course a year ago, but rushed through it in a day.
Pitfalls, high points, things others should know: I really enjoyed this course. The interactive platform presents things in a way that is relatable to the real world. Hundreds of live simulations are sprinkled through the course that allow you to gain an intuition for economics through experimentation. The course team showed their sense of humor by inserting fun anecdotes and jokes throughout the material.  
Because this course presents topics in several different formats, it works well for diverse learning styles. Regardless of whether you learn by reading, answering questions, or experimentation, this course will effectively teach you economics.
A massive amount of material is crammed into this course. Despite nominally being a macroeconomics course, it spends about half of the time teaching microeconomics. A bit of accounting is included as well. It's a good idea to take microeconomics and/or accounting I immediately after this course.
It is absolutely imperative to have a strong grasp of graphs, tables, charts, and equations before attempting this course. Many hundreds of those figures are used in this course, and you are expected to interpret them. If you have a strong intuition for these, you'll do well in the course. If not, finish college algebra first. There is a math warm-up and review in the Module 0: Prerequisites section. Complete that before committing to the course. If you struggle there, you won't be ready to take on this course.
1-10 Difficulty level: 4. This course takes a ton of time due to the amount of material included. If you put in the effort to go through all of the course items, and can keep up with the pace, you'll do fine.
Final grade: A. A curve was applied to all grade levels in my term.


Provider: ASU Universal Learner Courses
Course: ECN 212: Microeconomic Principles: Decision-Making Under Scarcity
Course content: Generally the standard ASU ULC format, with lecture videos, short readings, Cerego flashcards, homework practice questions, and unit quizzes. Two exams, each covering about half of the course. Optional but helpful discussions. The two optional live sessions were helpful for review. In particular, the second live session does an in-depth review of many challenging concepts included in the final. 
Final exam format: 50 Multiple choice questions, proctored.
Final exam content vs course content/practice exams: I don't think the course did a great job at preparing for the final. I had to invest a lot of effort into figuring things out on my own. The quiz and exam questions are sometimes set up and formatted differently compared to the lectures, readings, and homework. There were a few minor concepts that I never really grasped at all. 
Time taken on course: 7.5 weeks
Because of my knowledge from the ASU Macroeconomics course, the first half of this course was a breeze. I was able to skip over nearly all of the lectures and readings. I only spent maybe an hour going through the Cerego content mastery and figuring out the homework & quiz problems.  
The second half of the course is very challenging. I had to watch and rewatch all of the lecture videos to get some understanding of the concepts. 
Familiarity with subject before course: I took the Sophia course a year ago, but rushed through it in a day. 
I completed the ASU Macroeconomics course in the preceding term, which covered a lot of microeconomics concepts. 
Pitfalls, high points, things others should know: This is a very dry course. It was a big letdown after the great macro course. There are just PDF readings extracted from an OpenStax textbook, along with lecture videos also explaining and demonstrating the concepts. Unlike the macro course, there are very few interactive elements that allow you to gain understanding through hands-on experimentation. 
It is absolutely imperative to have a strong grasp of graphs, tables, charts, and equations before attempting this course. 
I strongly recommend taking the ASU Macroeconomics course in the preceding term. 
1-10 Difficulty level: 4. You'll have to invest significant brainpower to figure out the second half of the course. Unlike the macro course, it's easy to get lost. 
Final grade: High A. A significant curve was applied to the C grade in my term. 


Provider: ASU Universal Learner Courses
Course: ACC 231: Uses of Accounting Information I
Course content: Like most ASU ULC courses, this course utilizes readings extracted from an OpenStax textbook along with lecture videos. Unlike other courses, this course places that content into a Sophia-like platform, along with practice and challenge questions. A significant portion of the grade is participation points, awarded for simply engaging with all of the content. After that, each module contains a quiz and an extensive applied accounting scenario. You'll be expected to use what you learned in the module to manage the books of a simulated lemonade stand startup. Multiple attempts are allowed in these exercises, with terse feedback on incorrect items. 
Unlike most ASU courses, there are three cumulative exams. Only the final is proctored. Each exam covers everything in the course up to that point. Exams allow several notecards for formulas and key facts. 
Optional but helpful discussions and live sessions. 
Final exam format: 50 Multiple choice and true/false questions, proctored. The exam covers the entire course, with a focus on the previous third. All of the exams have similar question types and intensities. Several notecards are allowed for formulas, which you'll likely need. 
Because of the grading setup in this course, it's possible to pass without the final (but it's still required to get credit). 
Final exam content vs course content/practice exams: I felt very well prepared. As with most ASU ULC courses, the exam questions are highly similar or identical to quiz questions. 
Time taken on course: About 8-10 hours per week for 7.5 weeks. The content in this course takes a lot of time to get through. 
Familiarity with subject before course: I took the Sophia course a year ago, but rushed through it in a day.
Pitfalls, high points, things others should know: This course does a really great job at teaching and applying accounting. It does require a significant time and effort commitment, but it will clearly teach you everything you need to know. 
I took this course during its debut term. There were numerous irritating technical, content, and formatting glitches throughout the course. Thankfully, the course team and students were extremely engaged in the discussions nearly 24/7, constantly applying fixes, workarounds, and revisions. By the next time this course is offered, the quality should be quite high. 
The first several weeks cover core accounting rules and principles, while the rest of the course explains how to apply them to specific situations. Make sure that you immediately understand and memorize the accounting equation. That should be your number one priority during the first weeks. Know what items count as assets and liabilities, and how increases and decreases are reflected as debits and credits. Once you understand this, you can derive many other things.  
I took the ASU Macroeconomics course in the preceding term. I think the bit of accounting covered in that course allowed me to hit the ground running with a good initial grasp of accounting equations. 
Whenever you encounter a key formula or rule, save a picture/screenshot. That will make preparing for the exams and writing out your notecards much easier. 
1-10 Difficulty level: 4. The pace is intense but doable. 
Final grade: High A. A generous curve was applied to all grade levels in my term. 

That concludes all of my ASU EA/ULC courses so far! I'm still planning on several more this year to take care of lab science and math requirements as I get closer to my goal of >=60 RA graded credits.
Done: TESU ASNSM-CS
Almost done: TESU BSBA-CIS+GM
In Progress: TESU BS-Cybersecurity + BTM Cybersecurity, ASNSM-Math
Earned credits from Sophia, ASU ULC, TEEX, Microsoft, Strayer, TESU, Saylor, DSST, CLEP, CompTIA, and others since starting in April 2020
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#32
At ASU ULC:
BIO 100: The Living World
SES 106: Habitable Worlds


These courses just started so I haven't gone through (all of) the content yet. But I'm not sure I'm going to finish these courses and I wanted to let everyone know that neither of these courses has midterms or final exams. It's essentially all one big assignment-thing on a platform called "SmartSparrow". (Sort of akin to how the ALEKS math courses work.) It's also self-paced in that the entirety of the course contents are available as soon as class starts and you can complete them all as quickly or as slowly as you like as long as you finish by course end. I am not sure if you are able to finalize your grade before course end but I think that you are.

But, if you expect easy, ASU has this to say about both courses:

Quote:[This course] is a 4 credit course that counts for ASU SQ credit. Because we designed the course around a “learning by doing” philosophy, you have to do the work to get by - just like in a laboratory class. This is not a class in which you can just take some multiple-choice tests to show you know some facts and skate by with a passing grade.

Because we are developing and deploying novel content using novel technologies, we will encounter some rough edges - bugs and other snafus. We’ll work through them and you won’t be penalized. We apologize in advance, and assure you it’ll be ok. This all adds up to an intense workload. Don’t expect to breeze through. Don’t procrastinate! On that note, all the lessons are open, so technically you can go through the whole course and finish earlier than scheduled.

For Habitable Worlds, it notes that the math you're going to be using is mostly just things like fractions and exponents so it shouldn't be that difficult for people who are at least okay with math.

Video introducing The Living World (formerly called BioBeyond): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6wfvXfr9hs

Video introducing Habitable Worlds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVXLYEJ_CWQ
In progress:
TESU - BA Computer Science; BSBA CIS; ASNSM Math & CS; ASBA

Completed:
Pierpont - AAS BOG
Sophia (so many), The Institutes (old), Study.com (5 courses)
ASU: Human Origins, Astronomy, Intro Health & Wellness, Western Civilization, Computer Appls & Info Technology, Intro Programming
Strayer: CIS175, CIS111, WRK100, MAT210
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#33
(06-13-2021, 11:26 AM)rachel83az Wrote: At ASU ULC:
BIO 100: The Living World
SES 106: Habitable Worlds


These courses just started so I haven't gone through (all of) the content yet. But I'm not sure I'm going to finish these courses and I wanted to let everyone know that neither of these courses has midterms or final exams. It's essentially all one big assignment-thing on a platform called "SmartSparrow". (Sort of akin to how the ALEKS math courses work.) It's also self-paced in that the entirety of the course contents are available as soon as class starts and you can complete them all as quickly or as slowly as you like as long as you finish by course end. I am not sure if you are able to finalize your grade before course end but I think that you are.

But, if you expect easy, ASU has this to say about both courses:

Quote:[This course] is a 4 credit course that counts for ASU SQ credit. Because we designed the course around a “learning by doing” philosophy, you have to do the work to get by - just like in a laboratory class. This is not a class in which you can just take some multiple-choice tests to show you know some facts and skate by with a passing grade.

Because we are developing and deploying novel content using novel technologies, we will encounter some rough edges - bugs and other snafus. We’ll work through them and you won’t be penalized. We apologize in advance, and assure you it’ll be ok. This all adds up to an intense workload. Don’t expect to breeze through. Don’t procrastinate! On that note, all the lessons are open, so technically you can go through the whole course and finish earlier than scheduled.

For Habitable Worlds, it notes that the math you're going to be using is mostly just things like fractions and exponents so it shouldn't be that difficult for people who are at least okay with math.

Video introducing The Living World (formerly called BioBeyond): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6wfvXfr9hs

Video introducing Habitable Worlds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVXLYEJ_CWQ

Hey just curious if you have an update on your experience with these courses?
WGU BSIT Complete January 2022
(77CU transferred in)(44/44CU ) 

SANS Academy

RA(non WGU)(51cr)
JST/TESU Eval of NAVY Training(85/99cr)
The Institutes, TEEX, NFA(9cr): Ethics, Cyber 101/201/301, Safety
Sophia(60cr): 23 classes
Study.com(31cr): Eng 105, Fin 102, His 108, Lib Sci 101, Math 104, Stat 101, CS107, CS 303, BUS 107
CLEP(9cr): Intro Sociology 63 Intro Psych 61 US GOV 71
OD(9cr): Robotics, Cyber, Programming
CSM(3cr)
Various IT/Cybersecurity Certifications from: CompTIA, Google, Microsoft, AWS, GIAC, LPI, IBM
Computer Science Fundamentals MicroBachelor(3cr)
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#34
Unfortunately, I got busy and was unable to continue these. I would like to do them the next time that they come around, though! Each segment takes about an hour to do, so I don't recommend taking them both at the same time. If you were to really push it and do 8-hour days of nothing but one of the courses, you could finish in less than a week. I don't really recommend doing that because it would start to get quite tedious. But the option exists. They definitely feel like more "fun" classes to do when you need a break from SDC courses.

If they were 100% self-paced (continuous start dates), the Biology one could possibly be a good option for UMPI students.
In progress:
TESU - BA Computer Science; BSBA CIS; ASNSM Math & CS; ASBA

Completed:
Pierpont - AAS BOG
Sophia (so many), The Institutes (old), Study.com (5 courses)
ASU: Human Origins, Astronomy, Intro Health & Wellness, Western Civilization, Computer Appls & Info Technology, Intro Programming
Strayer: CIS175, CIS111, WRK100, MAT210
Reply
#35
(08-19-2021, 03:41 AM)rachel83az Wrote: Unfortunately, I got busy and was unable to continue these. I would like to do them the next time that they come around, though! Each segment takes about an hour to do, so I don't recommend taking them both at the same time. If you were to really push it and do 8-hour days of nothing but one of the courses, you could finish in less than a week. I don't really recommend doing that because it would start to get quite tedious. But the option exists. They definitely feel like more "fun" classes to do when you need a break from SDC courses.

If they were 100% self-paced (continuous start dates), the Biology one could possibly be a good option for UMPI students.

Sounds good. I might have an opportunity to take 1 next year but I haven't seen any reviews. It sounds like it might be interesting and worth doing in the future.
WGU BSIT Complete January 2022
(77CU transferred in)(44/44CU ) 

SANS Academy

RA(non WGU)(51cr)
JST/TESU Eval of NAVY Training(85/99cr)
The Institutes, TEEX, NFA(9cr): Ethics, Cyber 101/201/301, Safety
Sophia(60cr): 23 classes
Study.com(31cr): Eng 105, Fin 102, His 108, Lib Sci 101, Math 104, Stat 101, CS107, CS 303, BUS 107
CLEP(9cr): Intro Sociology 63 Intro Psych 61 US GOV 71
OD(9cr): Robotics, Cyber, Programming
CSM(3cr)
Various IT/Cybersecurity Certifications from: CompTIA, Google, Microsoft, AWS, GIAC, LPI, IBM
Computer Science Fundamentals MicroBachelor(3cr)
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#36
I finally had time to write my reviews on the new science courses. I combined my writeups due to the related nature of the courses. 

Provider: ASU Universal Learner Courses
Course: BIO 100: The Living World / BioBeyond
Course: SES 106: Habitable Worlds / HabWorlds
Course content: These are science courses for people who despise traditional science courses. There are zero lectures, quizzes, or exams. Everything is structured as experiential learning activities on the Inspark Smart Sparrow platform. There are many interactive simulations, with some larger virtual projects. 
BIO 100 has minimal math, mostly just understanding graphs and doing arithmetic. 
SES 106, on the other hand, heavily uses scientific notation. You'll need to be comfortable working with that. I strongly recommend prior completion of College Algebra. 
SES 106 has you do all of your calculations using spreadsheets. You will need to know how to write and use spreadsheet formulas. Take CIS 105 before this course if you aren't experienced with excel or alternatives. 
Time taken on course: As with most of the ASU ULC courses, the time requirements provided in the syllabi are grossly exaggerated. It's possible to grind out BIO 100 in two weeks or less given sufficient time and stamina. A handful of my peers did it in less than one week. SES 106 could probably be finished in 2-3 weeks. 
I strongly suggest trying to finish each module in a single sitting, and each unit in a single day. Otherwise, you'll have to backtrack and get lost.  
Familiarity with subject before course: I completed the Sophia Human Biology and ASU Human Origins courses last year, which had some relevance to BIO 100. Near-zero familiarity with any of the SES 106 subject material, though. 
I've previously completed College Algebra at Sophia and Computer Apps at ASU and Sophia. 
Pitfalls, high points, things others should know: The first week of both courses is an introduction to related science fundamentals. Much of the content is duplicated across BIO 100 and SES 106. If it's straightforward, you're ready to take on the courses. If not, brush up on your core skills first. 
Both courses allow attempting items multiple times for better scores, although there is sometimes a penalty. 
The digital content is very computer-intensive. When running the simulations, quit everything else running on your computer. I've never heard my laptop fans spin as intensely as they did during the BIO 100 inside the cell simulation. 
Have the help site up in another tab or window as you work through these courses. It often provides critical instructions or information not included in the main window. 
Often, some of the simulations will misbehave or get into a bad state. When this happens, perform a hard reload of the page with Ctrl+Shift+R. This refreshes the page without using the browser cache, which usually fixes wonky behavior. If some content isn't visible, try zooming in or out. 
BIO 100: Unit 2 is extremely tedious. Try to take good field notes covering everything in the text box and images during the observations. You'll figure out the tags when organizing the classification later. Focus on things like where the organism lives, if/how it moves, and how it gets energy. Unit 6 is very challenging. I often felt completely lost and had to redo a few modules
Take ASM 246 Human Origins after BIO 100. The education on species classification, evolution, and fossils will make that course substantially easier. 
SES 106: do not try to handle the calculations by hand! Properly set up and organize your formulas in spreadsheets as the course prompts you to do. You'll need to refer back to your formulas and results later. Google sheets is fine, you don't need excel. 
Difficulty: 2-3. These courses are really a test of your diligence as a student, not scientific prowress. If you invest the effort and patience, an A is very attainable in BIO 100. SES 106 is a bit more challenging but still doable. 
Final grade: High A in BIO 100. Unfortunately, due to a sudden medical issue and the impending start of my TESU courses, I only made it about halfway through SES 106 this time. Might try it again in the future. 
Related opportunities: there are some double-dipping possibilities here. Together, BIO 100 and SES 106 cover much of the content on the Natural Sciences CLEP. 
Related to SES 106, both ASU and InstantCert offer astronomy courses. I haven't taken them, so I don't know if they would make sense to take before or after SES 106. 
Suggested Plan: In a preceding term, take Computer Apps and College Algebra
Sign up for BIO 100 and SES 106 together. Complete the first unit of both courses during the first week, then pay the credit eligibility upgrade fee. 
Do BIO 100 over the next 2 weeks, then SES 106 over the next 3 weeks. Meanwhile, register for the CLEP natural sciences course on modernstates. Later, fill in any remaining gaps and take the exam. In the next term, take ASM 246 Human Origins at ASU. 

Other new ASU courses: I see that Inspark lists several other smart courses on their website, including Critical Chemistry and Anatomy & Physiology Basics. Both of these courses appear to be in use at regular ASU and/or ASU digital prep already, so hopefully, they'll come to ULC eventually. I really want to avoid that cursed chemistry for engineers course. 
In other news, the new ASU ULC Psychology course debuted in August. Another term starts in October, which I may pursue.
Done: TESU ASNSM-CS
Almost done: TESU BSBA-CIS+GM
In Progress: TESU BS-Cybersecurity + BTM Cybersecurity, ASNSM-Math
Earned credits from Sophia, ASU ULC, TEEX, Microsoft, Strayer, TESU, Saylor, DSST, CLEP, CompTIA, and others since starting in April 2020
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#37
I skipped writing reviews for the 2 ASU EA/ULC/GFA courses I did last year but figured I'd write about the ones I'm doing now. I just finished the proctored final for this one a few minutes ago, though I haven't yet received final grades for the last few assignments.

Provider: ASU Universal Learner Courses
Course: COM 100: Intro to Human Communication. 
Course content: Generally the standard ASU ULC format, with lecture videos, long readings, one weekly essay, and weekly quizzes. One exam covering the entire course. 
Final exam format: 70 multiple choice questions, proctored. Covers all 7 weeks.
Final exam content vs course content/practice exams: The final pulled some questions from the weekly quizzes. The course adequately prepares you for the final.
Time taken on course: A few hours per week to go through the content and do the quiz and an additional few hours for the weekly essay. 7-8 weeks long.
Familiarity with subject before course: Somewhat familiar. I'd done a few communication courses through Sophia and the Sociology and Psychology CLEPs which gave me a decent background.
Pitfalls, high points, things others should know: They hit a huge grading bottleneck at the beginning of the course so I didn't receive feedback/grades from my first 4-5 essays until more than halfway through the course which was pretty frustrating. I'm actually still waiting on grades from my last 2 papers as well. They weren't too strict with grading but I did get points deducted on a few essays for going over the word count, which was a very narrow band of 400-450 words. I'm used to writing 500-600 words so I had to adjust to accommodate since I didn't realize they'd take points away. Also, instead of submitting a word document, you had to copy and paste your essay into a small submission form which was frustrating and destroyed any attempts at nice formatting. 

The quizzes are open book and I recommend having it open as you work through the week's course content to answer as you go rather than viewing/reading everything and then having to go back later to double-check stuff as you're answering the quiz. About 90% of the questions come right from the course readings and course lectures but every quiz had about 2-3 questions not directly covered by the readings/lectures but I did find them in the open-source textbook that the course uses.
1-10 Difficulty level: 3-4. I always stress over papers more than I should. It wasn't super intense.
Final grade: A(I actually haven't received grades for the last 2 assignments yet but I've already met the threshold for A)
WGU BSIT Complete January 2022
(77CU transferred in)(44/44CU ) 

SANS Academy

RA(non WGU)(51cr)
JST/TESU Eval of NAVY Training(85/99cr)
The Institutes, TEEX, NFA(9cr): Ethics, Cyber 101/201/301, Safety
Sophia(60cr): 23 classes
Study.com(31cr): Eng 105, Fin 102, His 108, Lib Sci 101, Math 104, Stat 101, CS107, CS 303, BUS 107
CLEP(9cr): Intro Sociology 63 Intro Psych 61 US GOV 71
OD(9cr): Robotics, Cyber, Programming
CSM(3cr)
Various IT/Cybersecurity Certifications from: CompTIA, Google, Microsoft, AWS, GIAC, LPI, IBM
Computer Science Fundamentals MicroBachelor(3cr)
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#38
Can anyone please tell approximate time for transfer ONU credit to TESU? I could not find this info, maybe i missed it. Thanks
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#39
Provider: ASU Universal Learner Courses
Course: CEE 181 Technological, Social and Sustainable Systems
Course content: Generally the standard ASU ULC format, with lecture videos, long readings, content mastery(Cerego) and weekly quizzes. Also a midterm and final. 
Final exam format: 40 multiple choice questions, proctored. Covers the last 4 weeks.
Final exam content vs course content/practice exams: The final pulled some questions from the weekly quizzes. The course adequately prepares you for the final.
Time taken on course: A few hours per week to go through the content and do the quiz. 7-8 weeks long.
Familiarity with subject before course: Very familiar. I've done a lot of courses that touch on technology, sustainability/environment, engineering, ethics and social aspects of those topics. I have an interest in a lot of the topics covered in the class so had already picked up a fair amount of knowledge over the years.
Pitfalls, high points, things others should know: The course is fairly straightforward. There are a few questions I encountered that I don't think were directly covered by the course material. Additionally, there were a few questions that were written poorly or had wrong/conflicting answers that I submitted to the instructors.

The lectures and reading were longer than ideal, I didn't do any of it beyond what I needed to look up to pass quizzes. The material is interesting to me, I just have limited time and the lectures are too long-winded for my taste, even with speeding up the video
1-10 Difficulty level: 2. I had a lot of background knowledge so didn't need to "learn" a whole lot to pass but still learned and enjoyed myself.
Final grade: A. only missed a handful of questions throughout the course.

Overall, I think this was a very enjoyable course that shows the relationships be multiple topics. It's probably a bit harder for people brand new to the topics. This course is the definition of "multidisciplinary."
WGU BSIT Complete January 2022
(77CU transferred in)(44/44CU ) 

SANS Academy

RA(non WGU)(51cr)
JST/TESU Eval of NAVY Training(85/99cr)
The Institutes, TEEX, NFA(9cr): Ethics, Cyber 101/201/301, Safety
Sophia(60cr): 23 classes
Study.com(31cr): Eng 105, Fin 102, His 108, Lib Sci 101, Math 104, Stat 101, CS107, CS 303, BUS 107
CLEP(9cr): Intro Sociology 63 Intro Psych 61 US GOV 71
OD(9cr): Robotics, Cyber, Programming
CSM(3cr)
Various IT/Cybersecurity Certifications from: CompTIA, Google, Microsoft, AWS, GIAC, LPI, IBM
Computer Science Fundamentals MicroBachelor(3cr)
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#40
Just finished this one as well! My feedback is largely the same. 


Provider: ASU Universal Learner Courses
Course: CEE 181 Technological, Social and Sustainable Systems
Course content: Generally the standard ASU ULC format, with lecture videos, long readings, Cerego Content mastery flashcards, and weekly quizzes. Also a midterm and final. 
Final exam format: 40 multiple choice questions, proctored. Mainly covers the last 4 weeks, although you'll need to know some concepts from earlier weeks including the three levels of technology.
Final exam content vs course content/practice exams: The final pulled some questions from the weekly quizzes. It also had several multiple-selection questions which the quizzes didn't have. The course adequately prepares you for the final.
Time taken on course: Usually just an hour or two per week across 8 weeks. 
Familiarity with subject before course: Very familiar. My prior education, work, and personal interests previously introduced me to the themes found in this course. In particular, I found that FSE 150 - Engineering Grand Challenges at ASU ULC prepared me quite well by thoroughly covering sustainable engineering concepts. 
Pitfalls, high points, things others should know: This is a fairly straightforward course. Be aware that many of the questions and concepts are normative/subjective; there isn't always an obvious positive answer. Take time to thoroughly review every question, because some have poor or confusing wording. 
This is a multi-disciplinary course spanning several subject areas. It touches on technology, sustainability/environment, engineering, ethics, and social well-being. Students familiar with these topics will likely do well, and those who aren't will struggle. 
Much of the included lectures and readings were overly lengthy. I only skimmed through the slides and readings as needed to pass the quizzes. It's interesting material, but I didn't have time for it. 
1-10 Difficulty level: 2. My prior knowledge easily carried me through this course. 
Final grade: High A. I only missed a handful of questions throughout the course. 
In my term, the grade cutoffs were adjusted downwards by 3%. I felt that this was very generous.
Done: TESU ASNSM-CS
Almost done: TESU BSBA-CIS+GM
In Progress: TESU BS-Cybersecurity + BTM Cybersecurity, ASNSM-Math
Earned credits from Sophia, ASU ULC, TEEX, Microsoft, Strayer, TESU, Saylor, DSST, CLEP, CompTIA, and others since starting in April 2020
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